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I am trying to validate a properietery database (actually, a file system, but for this discussion, I want to keep this simple). The database has the following properties:

It can have either 1 or 2 primary keys, and they MUST be integers. Columns could be string (non-ascii permitted), integer, long, or datetime

I want to validate that the values I ask this database to store are correctly stored with a large number of records (> 500k records). So for this, I want to extend a tool that generates data that I can easily validate later.

So basically, say this is the sample schema:

pk1 (int - primary key)
pk2 (int - primary key)
s1 (string)
l1 (long)
i1 (int)

I want to generate 500k records with this tool. Then, at any given time, I want to be able to sanity check a given record. I might perform a series of operations (say backup, then restore the database), and then "spot check" few records. So I want to be able to quickly validate that the entry for record for primary key (pk1 = 100, pk2 = 1) is valid.

What is the best way to go about generating the values for each column such that it can be easily validated later. The values need not be fully random, but they should not repeat frequently either, so some of the compression logic could be hit too.

As an example, say "somehow" the tool generated the following value for a row:

pk1 = 1000
pk2 = 1
s1 = "foobar"
l1 = 12345
i1 = 17

Now I perform several operations, and I want to validate that at the end of this, this row has not corrupted. I have to be able to quickly generate expected values for s1, l1, and i1 - given pk1=1000 and pk2=1 - so it can be validated really quickly.

Ideas?

(I can't post answer to my own question since I am a new used, so adding this:) Ok, so I have to possible approaches I could pursue:

Approach# 1: use HASH(tablename) ^ HASH(fieldname) ^ pk1 ^ pk2 as the seed. This way, I can easily compute the seed for each column when validating. On the flip side, this could be expensive when generating data for lots of rows since the seed need to computed once per column. So for the above schema, I would have 500k*3 seeds (to generate 500k records).

Approach# 2 (Proposed by Philipp Wendler): Generate one seed per row, and store the seed in the first column of that row. If the first column is an int or long, store the value as-is. If the first column is a string, store the seed in the first x bytes, and then pad it upto the required string length with characters generated using that seed.

I like approach #2 better because there is just one seed per row - making the data generation somewhat faster than approach #1.

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So I am thinking of more creative solution... What if I generate the seed this way: Seed = HASH(tablename) ^ HASH (columnname) ^ pk1 ^ pk2 Now I can easily compute the seed given pk1 and pk2, while still keeping things somewhat random across tables.. The columnname could repeat across tables for the same pk1 and pk2 values.. but that is OK since functionally speaking, they should have the same values anyway.. –  walletless Feb 7 '12 at 19:11
    
The other option is to pursue what Philipp Wendler suggested below: Use the first column of the table to store the seed used. If this is an int or long, just store the seed as is into it. If this is a string, use the first n bytes to store the seed, and pad the field to the required length using characters generated using that seed. –  walletless Feb 7 '12 at 19:26
    
Do you generate primary keys as well? If yes, you could use them to store hash of other columns. This could give you some collisions on insert of course (but if you generate pk at random, this could also happen) –  wmz Feb 7 '12 at 19:32
    
@wmz Yes, I use a different seed to generate the PKs. There is a different business logic on how PKs are generated so I have a good spread. For example, one of the requirement is that 35% of the entries have the same PK1 values, but unique PK2 values.. there are different business requirements for each table - but I wanted to make the problem simple by leaving out those details since I can figure that part out myself. –  walletless Feb 7 '12 at 20:04
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3 Answers

You could just generate arbitrary random data, calculate an hash code (MD5 for example, as it doesn't need to be cryptographically secure) and store the hash code with your data. You can have a separate column for the hash code, or for example you can append it to any string column.

For verifying, separate the stored hash code from the rest of the data in that row, re-calculate the hash code and compare them for equality. If they don't match, your data was modified.

This assumes that you want to protect you data only from accidental modifications (not from a malicious attacker).

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Modifying schema is not an option, unfortunately. One option I thought was to start with a fixed seed as an input to the application, and xor the pk1 and pk2 with it. Then use that as the seed to random. So, say I use the input seed as 12345 (it could be anything - system ticks, for example). So the seed to my random function would be 12345 ^ 1000 ^ 1. And then using that random with the apache commons, I could produce each column. The problem with that approach is that I get the same values for several rows. –  walletless Feb 7 '12 at 19:01
    
Are your strings of arbitrary length? Do you always have a string column? If so, just append the hash code at the end of the data for the first string column (for example). Otherwise you could select one or several number columns (it should be enough if you only store some of the bits of the hash code, for example 64 of them). –  Philipp Wendler Feb 7 '12 at 19:05
    
If I use this approach, the verification tool just needs to know the start input (12345 in this case), and can easily validate any row given pk1 and pk2 values. But, the problem is that this causes a lot of dupe values. The data will be generated for 100s of tables, so I don't want to store the seeds for each row separately if I can avoid it. –  walletless Feb 7 '12 at 19:06
    
Nope.. there is no guarantee that there is always a string column. Let's not worry about the string length for now - if I can come up with a predictable seed for a row, I can solve the problem easily for any string length. The problem is just coming up with a seed that I can easily compute/retreive later during validation –  walletless Feb 7 '12 at 19:08
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Well, you will always have some columns, won't you? So you can spread your seed or hash code over the first columns which are there, regardless of their type. Just take as many columns as you need to store the bits of your seed/hash code. –  Philipp Wendler Feb 7 '12 at 19:12
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Maybe something from apache commons could be solution

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Thanks Mouster. I have already looked at this. The problem is coming up with the "seed" value to use, so I can easily generate the string. So, essentially, this problem is: Given pk1 (1000) and pk2 (1); what is the seed that I should use in a Random generator so I can consistently create the same values for s1, l1, and i1 every time. –  walletless Feb 7 '12 at 18:51
    
@walletless Just the store the seed in one of the columns (similarly to what you would do with a hash code as proposed in my solution). Then you can just generate a random seed for each row, and the data in that row from the seed. –  Philipp Wendler Feb 7 '12 at 18:57
    
This method relies on the fact that the random number generation algorithm that is used for verification is exactly the same as the one used for generation. This may sound obvious now, but it could be that implementors of such generators don't guarantee this and change their algorithm slightly in the future (for example, in the next version of a library). Then your data suddenly wouldn't be verifiable anymore. By using a well-standardized algorithm like any of the common hash codes this is problem goes away. –  Philipp Wendler Feb 7 '12 at 19:01
    
Modifying schema is not an option, unfortunately. One option I thought was to start with a fixed seed as an input to the application, and xor the pk1 and pk2 with it. Then use that as the seed to random. So, say I use the input seed as 12345 (it could be anything - system ticks, for example). So the seed to my random function would be 12345 ^ 1000 ^ 1. And then using that random with the apache commons, I could produce each column. The problem with that approach is that I get the same values for several rows.. –  walletless Feb 7 '12 at 19:06
    
If I use this approach, the verification tool just needs to know the start input (12345 in this case), and can easily validate any row given pk1 and pk2 values. But, the problem is that this causes a lot of dupe values. The data will be generated for 100s of tables, so I don't want to store the seeds for each row separately if I can avoid it –  walletless Feb 7 '12 at 19:07
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This answers only second part of your question - what about making l1 storing hash of all the other fields? Then you can quickly verify if anything is corrupted

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The would work if the schema ALWAYS had a long. The set of columns for a given table may, or may not have any long columns - and it may have more than one long columns too. Modifying any existing schema is not an option since there are apps that rely on the schema being in a certain form - and modifying it will invalidate any functional test that would happen on top of the generated data. –  walletless Feb 7 '12 at 19:01
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