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The task is to get a user to input a password then, using recursion, make sure it has no vowels in it. If it does then let the user re-enter the password. This is what i have so far:

def passwordCheck(pwd):
    """checks if pwd has any vowels in it."""#doc string
    vowels = 'aeiou'#specifies the characters that aren't allowed
    if pwd == '':
        return 0
    elif pwd == None:
        return None#Shouldn't be necessary but just in case
    elif pwd[0] not in vowels:#checks that the 1st(0th) character is not a vowel
        return passwordCheck(pwd[1:])#gets rid of the 1st(0th) character and starts again
    elif pwd[0] in vowels:#checks if the 1st(0th) character is a vowel
        return 1#if it is, stops the function calls and returns a value

password = str(input('Please enter a password with no vowels in it: '))#asks user to input their new password
x = passwordCheck(password)#checks the password is valid, i.e. no vowels

while x == 1:#when the password entered contains a vowel
    print('\nSorry, that is not a valid password.\nYour password cannot contain any vowels.')#tells the user why their password is invalid
    password = str(input('\nPlease enter a different password: '))#gives the user a chance to re-enter their password
    x = passwordCheck(password)#checks to make sure the new password is valid

print('\nCongratulations, you have entered a valid password!')#tells the user if their desired password is valid
print('\nYou are now able to log on to the system with these credentials.')#could've been included on the previous line but looks neater here

I know this is probably not the most pythonic way of doing it but it works for me in most cases. I'd love to hear a better way but ideally someone can help in the same style. I don't want to just copy someones code without understanding it.

The question i have is dealing with the case where the user enters no password at all. The first if statement:

if pwd == '':
    return 0

I thought it just dealt with the case when the string had been fully recursed through, i.e. no vowels, but after a minutes inspection it's obvious this applies to no password as well. I had also tried using:

if pwd == None:
    return something

Now i'm thinking the problem could be because i said:

password = str(input('######'))

but i've fiddled with that as well and still can't can't seem to make that work either! I've tried google and searching stackoverflow but no luck so if anyone has any ideas/solution they think might be helpful I'd be very grateful to hear them. Thank you very much.

My main question is:

How can i differentiate between a string that's empty because it's been recursed through and the user inputting nothing?

Solved.

ended up using

def passwordValid(pwd):
if len(pwd)>0 and passwordCheck(pwd)==0:
    return pwd
else: return 'Fail'

password = str(input('Please enter a password with no vowels in it: '))#asks user to input their new password
y = passwordValid(password)#checks the password is valid, i.e. no vowels

while y == 'Fail':#when the password entered contains a vowel
    print('\nSorry, that is not a valid password.\nYour password cannot contain any vowels or be empty.')#tells the user why their password is invalid
    password = str(input('\nPlease enter a different password: '))#gives the user a chance to re-enter their password
    y = passwordValid(password)#checks to make sure the new password is valid


print('\nCongratulations, you have entered a valid password!')#tells the user if their desired password is valid
print('\nYou are now able to log on to the system with these credentials.')#could've been included on the previous line but looks neater here

Thank you Wayne Werner for fixing the title and the main question.

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3  
This is a terrible homework problem for recursion. (Not your fault, I know; just commenting.) –  cheeken Feb 7 '12 at 18:47
    
But, interestingly enough, the way I initially used/learned recursion (although it was actual validation, not making sure it had no vowels). It made using recursion much easier later in life. –  Wayne Werner Feb 7 '12 at 18:52
    
@cheeken Clearly as check_password(pwd) can be defined as return not any(~pwd.find(vowel) for vowel in 'aeiou') –  Dan D. Feb 7 '12 at 18:54
    
@cheeken: In a functional language you sure could use recursion for this. IMHO, Python is functional "enough" for this to be reasonably realistic, although it doesn't really support tail recursion and you should of course use a helper like any here. –  Niklas B. Feb 7 '12 at 18:58
    
@NiklasB. A lot of students have trouble with recursion and understanding when and why it is necessary. Problems like these, which are easily solvable with loops, only serve to confuse their understanding further, I feel. –  cheeken Feb 7 '12 at 20:12
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This problem can be broken down into (at least) three distinct subproblems:

  • check whether a string contains vowels
  • check whether a string is a valid password (length > X and has vowels)
  • get a password from the user

Your code should reflect this structure. You could therefore use the following function layout:

def has_vowels(string):
  if not string:  # check for empty string
    return False  # empty strings never have vowels
  # TODO we have a non-empty string at this point and can use recursion

def is_valid_password(string):
  return len(string) > 0 and not has_vowels(string)

def request_password():
  while True:   # use an endless loop here, we don't won't to repeat
                # the "input" statement. We could also change this to
                # something like `for i in range(3)` to allow only a limited
                # number of tries.
    passwd = input('Please enter a password with no vowels in it: ')
    # TODO check if input is valid, if yes, return, if no, print an error
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Wow....maybe don't post complete code as an answer to a homework assignment question. –  dusktreader Feb 7 '12 at 19:05
    
@dusktreader: Yeah, you are right. I stripped it a bit, maybe nobody notices :) –  Niklas B. Feb 7 '12 at 19:08
    
I won't tell! :D –  dusktreader Feb 7 '12 at 19:10
    
I did this a tiny bit different but it's mostly based on yours and @cheeken answers. I couldn't quite understand the first line of has_vowels() though. Thank you very much for the help, sorry i couldn't upvote your answer i don't have the reputation. –  RLoftus88 Feb 7 '12 at 19:37
    
@RLoftus: Glad I could help. An empty string evaluates to False in if statements, so this is the same as if len(string) == 0. –  Niklas B. Feb 7 '12 at 20:16
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Don't attempt to solve both problems with a single method. You have two ditinct critera: no vowels; minimum length.

def isPasswordValid(pwd):
    return len(pwd) > 4 and not passwordCheck(password)

x = isPasswordValid(password)

...

You could solve this with recursion by adding another parameter which indicates how many characters have been looped through, but that is clumsy and offers no real benefit.

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You can't differentiate between an empty string and an empty string. You can however set the variable to None, or to a string like "__no_string_entered_yet". That said, I don't see why you would need to, see the other answers.

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I believe this does what your question asks for:

  • Not allow an empty password (different than a "blank" password?)
  • Not allow vowels in the password

I opted not use if/elif/else in favor of structuring it so that valid characters "fall through"

def pwd_check(s):
    vowels = 'aeiou'
    if len(s) == 0: return False     # This is only valid in the first iteration
    if s[0] in vowels: return False
    if len(s) == 1: return True      # Success: a 1 character pwd with no vowels
    return pwd_check(s[1:])

I thought about putting checks in to make sure that a string like ' ' was not passed in, but I didn't see that explicitly asked for. pwd_check(password.strip()) solves this problem.

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Here's how I like to do.
For the fun, I added conditions of minimum and maximum lengths for the password:

def passwordCheck(pwd,vowels = 'aeiou',minimum=5,maximum=12):
    if pwd == '':
        return 0,None,None
    elif pwd[0] in vowels:
        return -1,None,None
    else:
        y = passwordCheck(pwd[1:])[0]
        if y==-1:
            return -1,None,None
        else:
            return y + 1,minimum,maximum



mess = 'Please enter a password with no vowels in it: '
while True:
    x,miin,maax = passwordCheckstr(input(mess))

    if x==-1:
        mess = ('\nSorry, that is not a valid password.\n'
                'Your password cannot contain any vowels.\n'
                'Please enter a different password: ')

    elif x==0:
        mess = ('\nSorry, you must enter a password.\n'
                'Please do enter a password: ')

    elif x<miin:
        mess = ('\nSorry, the password must have at least %d characters.\n'
                'The string you entered has %d characters.\n'
                'Please, enter a new longer password: ' % (miin,x))

    elif x>maax:
        mess = ('\nSorry, the password must have at most %d characters.\n'
                'The string you entered has %d characters.\n'
                'Please, enter a new shorter password: ' % (maax,x))

    else:
        print ('\nCongratulations, you have entered a valid password!\n'
               '\nYou are now able to log on to the system with these '
                 'credentials.') 
        break

edit

Another kind of algorithm.
I wasn't satisfied to return such tuple as -1,None,None

def check_password(forbidden,minimum,maximum):

    def passwordCheck(pwd,cnt=0,forbid = forbidden,
                      miin=minimum,maax = maximum):
        # cnt is the number of preceding turns of recursion
        # that have been already executed.
        if pwd == '':
            if cnt==0:
                # cnt==0 means that it's the first turn of recursion
                # since pwd is '', it means no entry has been done
                return 0
            elif cnt<miin:
                return -3
            elif cnt>maax:
                return -2
        elif pwd[0] in forbid:
            return -1
        else:
            if cnt in (-3,-2,-1):
                return cnt
            else:
                return passwordCheck( pwd[1:] , cnt+1 )


    mess = 'Please enter a password with no vowels in it: '
    while True:
        x = str(raw_input(mess)).strip()
        y = passwordCheck(x)

        if y==0:    # inexistent string
            mess = ('\nSorry, you must enter a password.\n'
                    'Please do enter a password: ')

        elif y==-1: # string contains a vowel
            mess = ('\nSorry, that is not a valid password.\n'
                    'Your password cannot contain any vowels.\n'
                    'Please enter a different password: ')

        elif y==-2: # string too long
            mess = ('\nSorry, the password must have at most %d characters.\n'
                    'The string you entered has %d characters.\n'
                    'Please, enter a new shorter password: ' % (maximum,len(x)))

        elif y==-3: # string too short
            mess = ('\nSorry, the password must have at least %d characters.\n'
                    'The string you entered has %d characters.\n'
                    'Please, enter a new longer password: ' % (minimum,len(x)))

        else:       # success
            print ('\nCongratulations, you have entered a valid password!\n'
                   'You are now able to log on to the system with these credentials.')
            break

# EXECUTION
check_password('aeiou',5,12)
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