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I've spent ages trying to improve this algorithm and work out what's going wrong, but I can't seem to work out why the outputted answer is incorrect.

I'm trying to solve Project Euler #12, to get the lowest triangular number to have over 500 divisors, but it says my answer is incorrect.

Here is my Python code:

import time

# function to get the number of divisors
def div(n):
    d=2
    for i in range(2,int(n**.5)+2):
        if (n % i) == 0:
            d += 1
    return d

start = time.time()

w = True
n=m=1
while w:
    n += 1
    s = (n*(n+1))/2 # nth triangle number
    r = div(s)
    if r > m:
        m = r
        print s,"has",r,"divisors"
        if r > 500:
            w = False

print "Solved in",((time.time()-start)*1000),"milliseconds"

And the output for that code is this (in 66 seconds):

3 has 2 divisors
6 has 4 divisors
36 has 6 divisors
120 has 9 divisors

...

76576500 has 289 divisors
103672800 has 325 divisors
236215980 has 385 divisors
842161320 has 513 divisors
Solved in 65505.5799484 milliseconds

However, if I input 842161320 into the Project Euler problem, it says it's incorrect.

What am I doing wrong?

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1  
Your initial output does not match the sample output in the problem statement - 28 should be the first triangle number with six divisors. –  Anders Lindahl Feb 7 '12 at 19:27
    
@Odomontois - I know, but just look if you search project euler there are 4554 results at the moment so I'm not exactly alone. Also I did all of them up to now without even using any other websites but just got really stuck on this one –  Alex Coplan Feb 8 '12 at 17:38
    
You might want to check this “eulerlib” I've created for some tools. –  tzot Feb 22 '12 at 22:32
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I see two bugs:

  • Your div function is broken: div(24) == 5, while it should be 8
  • Your 1st triangular number would be 3, although it should be 1

You could implement a working div like this:

import math
def divisors(n):
  return sum(1 for x in range(1, n+1) if n % x == 0)

Also, that code is inefficient as hell, some suggestions to improve it are:

Instead of calculating the nth triangular number using your formula, use a rolling sum:

import itertools

s = 0
for i in itertools.count(1):
  s += i
  if div(s) > 500:
    print s
    break

Also, Use prime factors to calculate the number of divisors. You can create a prime factor cache for maximum performance.

share|improve this answer
    
Right - the reason that that 1 wasn't appearing is that I set n=1, so it starts a little bit ahead. I was originally using a rolling sum but changed it to the nth formula. The only remaining problem is that div function –  Alex Coplan Feb 7 '12 at 19:36
    
@Alex: The wikipedia article I linked tells you that the number of divisors can be calculated using the prime factor representation of the number. Given that you have the prime factors p1**x1 * p2**x2 * p3**x3, then the number of divisors is (x1+1)(x2+1)(x3+1). You can also use the brute-force approach and simply check for every number from 1 to sqrt(n) if it's a divisor (see my answer for a suggestion). –  Niklas B. Feb 7 '12 at 20:07
1  
Niklas - have now used brute-force and simply doubled the value of 1 to sqrt(n) and it works just fine (apart from 1 where it returns 2!) but it now does the whole thing in only 6 seconds - see my answer –  Alex Coplan Feb 7 '12 at 20:10
1  
@Alex: Glad I could help :) If my answer was helpful, you are invited to upvote and accept. By the way, your div function returns wrong results for all numbers with an odd divisor count (AKA as square numbers 1, 4, 9, 16...) –  Niklas B. Feb 7 '12 at 20:13
    
Had already upvoted, but now accepted –  Alex Coplan Feb 7 '12 at 20:19
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You are undercounting the total number of divisors. 36, for example, has 9 divisors: 1,2,3,4,6,9,12,18,36. It's true the algorithm only needs to test numbers smaller than sqrt(n) to find all divisors, but you still need to include the implied "large" divisors in your count.

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Solved

With the help of Niklas, and changing my div method, I've got the answer. Also, it's now only takes 8% of the time my previous algorithm took.

The algorithm now looks like this:

import time
import itertools

def div(n):
    d=0
    for i in range(1,int(n**.5)+1):
        if (n % i) == 0:
            d += 1
    return 2*d

start = time.time()

s = m = 0
for i in itertools.count(1):
    s += i
    r = div(s)
    if r > m:
        m = r
        print s,"has",r,"factors"
        if div(s) > 500:
            break

print "Solved in",((time.time()-start)*1000),"milliseconds"
share|improve this answer
    
your div() function is incorrect (try div(4) or div(9)) –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Feb 8 '12 at 0:25
    
yes, if n is square of some number, this number counts twice in div() –  OleGG Feb 8 '12 at 2:52
    
@BlueRaja-DannyPflughoeft it works in this instance - I know that it isn't fully correct but it solves the puzzle –  Alex Coplan Feb 8 '12 at 8:00
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