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How does one take a file, copy it and append it to the end of a different file?

Does the file that I want copied need to be opened a read until EOF or can it be copied and appended?

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1  
With stdio you need to read one "byte" after another and copy them until end of file. –  Vyktor Feb 7 '12 at 19:28
1  
Reading a file byte-by-byte doesn't really sound like a good idea. You're better off allocating a much bigger buffer for the data, for example 16KB. –  Daniel Kamil Kozar Feb 7 '12 at 19:37
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I won't post this as an answer since you tagged this "c", but on linux: cat file1 >> file2. Cat takes file names as arguments and dumps each one to stdout. The >> operation is just like > for redirecting stdout, except it opens the destination file in append mode. EDIT: Alternatively, cat file1 file2 > file3 can be used to concatenate two files and direct their output to a third file. –  Brian McFarland Feb 7 '12 at 22:28
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6 Answers 6

Your question is not 100% clear to me, but this is how you would append a file to another. I used a 1 byte buffer, just for example. You can copy the file in chunks as well.

FILE *source = fopen("to_copy", "rb");
/* I'm assuming it opened OK */
FILE *dest = fopen("dest", "ab");
/* I'm assuming it opened OK, again */

char byte;

while (!feof(source)) 
{
    fread(&byte, sizeof(char), 1, source);
    fwrite(&byte, sizeof(char), 1, dest);
}

fclose(source);
fclose(dest);
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Why do you guys love 1-byte buffers so much? It's surely not as ineffective as issuing actual read/write syscalls with a 1-byte buffer, since the C library implementation most probably has some internal buffering, but still. –  Daniel Kamil Kozar Feb 7 '12 at 19:41
    
As I said, it was just an example. He can find whatever buffer size works best for him. –  Mihnea DB Feb 7 '12 at 19:43
    
Also, in the case of this code, feof, fread, and fwrite will all be executed for each byte of the file. The overhead will surely matter when the file is of a considerable size. –  Daniel Kamil Kozar Feb 7 '12 at 19:44
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To copy the contents of file tail to the end of file head, open tail for (text or binary) reading and head for append; something like this (modeled after Plan 9’s cat.c.):

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void
append(FILE *head, FILE *tail)
{
    char buf[BUFSIZ];
    size_t n;
    while ((n = fread(buf, 1, sizeof buf, tail)) > 0)
        if (fwrite(buf, 1, n, head) != n)
            abort();
    if (ferror(tail))
        abort();
}

int main(void)
{
    FILE *head = fopen("head", "ab");
    FILE *tail = fopen("tail", "rb");
    if (!head || !tail)
        abort();
    append(head, tail);

    fclose(head);
    fclose(tail);

    exit(EXIT_SUCCESS);
}

Proper error reporting has been left as an exercise to the reader.

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In addition to cnicutar's answer, I would say:

  • Open the file to which you need to append in 'append' mode ('a' argument to fopen()).

  • Open the file that you need to append in 'read' mode ('r' argument to fopen()).

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To append to a file you don't need to read every byte to find EOF, either open it in append mode fopen("/path/to/yourFileName", "ab"), or use fseek(yourFilePointer, 0,SEEK_END);

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I meant reaching EOF on the file that I want to copy to the other file already opened in append mode. –  Helium3 Feb 7 '12 at 21:41
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When you open a file in append mode, the file pointer is at the end of existing text by default. So when you write to that file, new contents will be "appended" to the text.

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Thats not what I ask, but thanks. I meant how to copy a files data and append it to another file, without reading the entire file I want to copy chunk by chunk. –  Helium3 Feb 7 '12 at 21:44
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Microsoft example.

Appending One File to Another File

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