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Would it be possible to add a new operator to the String class that looked something like

string val = anotherVal ??? "Default Val";

and worked like

string val = !String.IsNullOrEmpty(anotherVal) ? anotherVal : "Default Val";
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1 Answer

up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can't define your own operators for the string class and use them from C#. (F# allows you to create operators for arbitrary classes, a bit like extension methods but for other member types.)

What you can do is write an extension method:

public static string DefaultIfEmpty(this string original, string defaultValue)
{
    return string.IsNullOrEmpty(original) ? defaultValue : original;
}

And call it with:

string val = anotherValue.DefaultIfEmpty("Default Val");

If you don't want to evaluate the "default" string unless it's needed, you could have an overload taking a function:

public static string DefaultIfEmpty(this string original,
                                    Func<string> defaultValueProvider)
{
    return string.IsNullOrEmpty(original) ? defaultValueProvider() : original;
}

And call it with:

string val = anotherValue.DefaultIfEmpty(() => "Default Val");
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Well, you can add your own operators to the string class in F#, which is part of .NET. You just can't do it in C# - or use the F# operators from C#. –  Joel Mueller May 27 '09 at 22:17
    
Hmm... I'd say that F# lets you use operators defined elsewhere for types. But yes, I'll edit the answer to reflect that. –  Jon Skeet May 27 '09 at 22:44
    
Okay, true - you're not really adding the operator to the String class in F#, you're defining an infix operator that takes string parameters. I tried making an operator that does the same thing as DefaultIfEmpty, and it works great - except that it wouldn't work when I used question marks in the operator symbol, for some reason. –  Joel Mueller May 28 '09 at 15:50
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