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I currently have the following code that retrieves data from the database and then create a User. This code is used in many of my classe to create other objects such as News, Commentsetc...

It uses apache commons dbutils.

final ResultSetHandler<User> handler = new ResultSetHandler<User>() {

            @Override
            public User handle(ResultSet rs) throws SQLException {

                User user = null;
                if (rs.next()) {
                    user = new User();
                    user.setId(rs.getInt("id"));
                    user.setUsername(rs.getString("username"));
                    user.setPassword(rs.getString("password"));
                }
                return user;
            }
        };

        final User user = run.query(
                "SELECT id, username, password FROM users WHERE username = ? AND active = 2 LIMIT 1;", handler,
                username);

Would it be possible to wrap the QueryRunner in a generic class and override the query method so the handler instanciate the generic T with the ResultSet. I would make sure any Ttype would ahve a constructor accepting a ResultSet.

Like so :

        public class QueryExecuter<T> extends QueryRunner {
    private ResultSetHandler<T> _handler;

    public QueryExecuter(){//The T type was for testing haha
        super();
        handler = new ResultSetHandler<T>() {

            @Override
            public T handle(ResultSet rs) throws SQLException {

                T object = null;
                if (rs.next()) {
                    object = new T(rs);
                }
                return object;
            }
        };
    }
}

I don't know if you'll understand, but I hope so, ask me if you want more details or a better explanation.

EDIT

I thought I could use a AbstractClass instead of the generic type that all of the differents objects would extends but it seems like I can't write an abstract constructor. Will I have to make a static method that return an instance of the object like:

public abstract class DatabaseEntity {
    public static abstract DatabaseEntity create(ResultSet rs);//even this doesn't work...
}
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why do you need to pass T type in the constructor? –  yair Feb 7 '12 at 20:27
    
use reflection you can invoke class constructor with result set –  user1190541 Feb 7 '12 at 20:30
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Possible, yes? But its a bad idea.

You could do:

class ResultSetHandler<T> {
  ResultSetHandler<T>(Class<T> clazz) {
    this.clazz = clazz;
  }

  public T handle(ResultSet rs) throws SQLException {
    T object = null;
    if (rs.next()) {
      object = clazz.getConstructor(ResultSet.class).newInstance(rs)
    }
    return object;
  }
}

Mixing domain and database is a bad idea, however. What would be better, however, would be to define an abtract method that creates the object based on the resultset:

abstract class ResultSetHandler<T> {

  protected abstract T create(ResultSet rs);

  public T handle(ResultSet rs) throws SQLException {
    T object = null;
    if (rs.next()) {
      object = create(rs);
    }
    return object;
  }
}

Then, in your implementing class, you only need to provide a create() method instead of handling the result set yourself, for example:

h = new ResultSetHandler<Person>() {
  protected Person create(ResultSet rs) {
    return new Person(rs.getString("name"));
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for providing the same answer as mine, but with nice code examples. –  JB Nizet Feb 7 '12 at 20:47
    
You say that mixing the database with the domain isn't a good idea and I get that, but what would you do to build these objects from query results? –  David Feb 7 '12 at 20:57
    
I'm using a MVC architecture, so my model is there for persistance and knows how to save and update itself in the database but I use an utility to perform the queries against the database. Maybe use DAO? –  David Feb 7 '12 at 21:00
    
Yes, a DAO layer is what you'd end up doing. Essentially, a layer that knows how to convert between the two. –  Reverend Gonzo Feb 7 '12 at 22:44
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You could do something like that (by passing the class of the object to create, and use reflection to call its constructor), but I would find it bad design to have the POJO dependent on JDBC, and knowing not only how it's stored in database, but also which aliases have been used in the query used to load it.

In short, it's not the responsibility of the User POJO constructor to handle a result set of an external, unknown query.

You could design an AbstractSingleEntityHandler superclass which would just have the

if (rs.next()) {

block, and would delegate the actual entity creation to an abstract method, but you wouldn't gain much.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for being faster than me and writing exactly what I wanted to ;) –  Mateusz Dymczyk Feb 7 '12 at 20:33
    
I'm trying to do this because the handler body you see above in the first block of code, get repeated in every query for any object. I thought it would have been nice to ensure that my objects that comes from the db know how to construct themselves from a query result the querymethod would directly return the object. –  David Feb 7 '12 at 20:36
    
And what do you mean by POJO? –  David Feb 7 '12 at 20:37
    
POJO = Plain Old Java Object. An object that does not depend on any environment, such as a JEE container or, in your case, the JDBC API. You will have to have this code somewhere: either in a handler, or in the constructor. The most appropriate way is to place it in a handler, and not in the constructor. I don't see why putting it in the constructor would avoid any repetition. –  JB Nizet Feb 7 '12 at 20:45
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I do not think it is possible to do this in Java. You cannot create an instance of T in a generic. Generics in java are not really templates as in C++, they are only syntax sugar around an object which removes the casts and induces compile time warnings.

There is no way like in C# to constrain T so that it must have a constructor.

Your best bet if this is really neccessary is to resolve the appropriate class using reflection, but even then you will run into problem since you cannot know the runtime class of T as the method is being invoked - this information is stripped from the java bytecode. So you are left with passing the class to the method in order to use reflection on it. And I'm not too sure this is a good design idea anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
He can do it with reflection just as JB Nizet said. –  Mateusz Dymczyk Feb 7 '12 at 20:34
    
Definitely possible. You just need a reference to Class<T>. –  Reverend Gonzo Feb 7 '12 at 20:40
    
Yes, with reflection. You'd still need to pass the actual class to the method. You cannot go T.class as you would like to do, had the class information been present at runtime. –  Dervall Feb 7 '12 at 20:42
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