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If DerivedClass1 and DerivedClass2 are classes derived from BaseClass, where BaseClass is a polymorphic class, which of these two code snippets are correct?

BaseClass *ptr;

ptr = new DerivedClass1;
ptr->PrintName();

ptr = new DerivedClass2;
ptr->PrintName();

delete ptr;

or

BaseClass *ptr;

ptr = new DerivedClass1;
ptr->PrintName();

delete ptr;

ptr = new DerivedClass2;
ptr->PrintName();

delete ptr;

Does using 'new' multiple times before using 'delete' simply redefine ptr's value, or does it cause some kind of memory leak? Excuse me if this is a stupid question, but I couldn't seem to find an answer to it.

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Manual delete are a sign you are not using C++ correctly. Prefer to place pointers inside a smart pointer to manage it for you. – Loki Astari Feb 7 '12 at 21:08
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Your first example will certainly leak. Your second example could leak, say if PrintName() threw an exception.

A better idea is to use a smart pointer, such as std::unique_ptr:

std::unique_ptr<BaseClass> ptr;

ptr.reset(new DerivedClass1);
ptr->PrintName();

ptr.reset(new DerivedClass2);
ptr->PrintName();

Look, Ma, no delete!

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Cool, thanks. I'm wondering though, instead of using ptr = new DerivedClass1; do you have to use ptr.reset(new DerivedClass1); ? The first one gives me a syntax error. – Stupebrett Feb 8 '12 at 7:14
    
@Stupebrett: You're correct. I'll fix it. – Fred Larson Feb 8 '12 at 14:41

The second is correct. The first leaks an instance of DerivedClass1.

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Sure the second one is correct. The first results in memory leak.

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Of course it's a leak (in fact, it's both a memory leak and a lifetime leak). When you assign a value to a pointer variable, you lose the previously held value, and thus the pointer to the first dynamic object. Each dynamic object (i.e. object created with a new expression) must be destroyed manually (usually by a delete expression):

ptr = new Derived1;
delete ptr;
ptr = new Derived2;
delete ptr;
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