Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What's the difference between the following two pieces of code? Version B seems harder to read, with excessive use of open and closing tags, but I find a lot of tutorials and examples using this format. Is there a preferred approach, meaning a procedural reason for one over the other, or is this personal preference?

Version A (enclosed in php)

<?php 
    $test = array('a','b','c'); 

    if (isset($test))
        { 
        echo    '<div id="testmessage">
                <h2>
                    Test Message Below
                </h2>
                <ul>';

        foreach ($test as $t) 
            { 
            echo '<li>'.$t.'</li>';
            }

        echo '</ul>';
        echo '</div>';

        } 
?>

Version B (Multiple open and closing tags)

<?php   $test = array('a','b','c'); 
        if (isset($test)){ 
?>

    <div id="testmessage">
        <h2>
            Test Message Below
        </h2>
        <ul>

    <?php 
        foreach ($test as $t) 
        { 
    ?>

    <li><?php echo $t; ?></li>

    <?php 
        } 
    ?>

        </ul>
    </div>

<?php 
} 
?>
share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by Neal, Explosion Pills, Charles, casperOne Feb 7 '12 at 21:19

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

add comment

5 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

No real difference, but it is just not encouraged.

And I give you version C which might read a little better than B:

<?php   
    $test = array('a','b','c'); 
    if (isset($test)): ?>

    <div id="testmessage">
        <h2>
            Test Message Below
        </h2>
        <ul>

    <?php foreach ($test as $t): ?>

    <li><?php echo $t; ?></li>

    <?php endforeach;    ?>

        </ul>
    </div>

<?php endif; ?>
share|improve this answer
    
As a matter of personal preference, I hate this style, because it reminds me of VB too much, and VB makes me cringe. :) –  SpikeX Feb 7 '12 at 21:00
    
@SpikeX ahh but it is much easier to follow then random } and { –  Neal Feb 7 '12 at 21:00
    
Not if you indent correctly. ;) Your HTML should line up with the brackets as if they were inside of them. –  SpikeX Feb 7 '12 at 21:01
    
@SpikeX lol no real indenting with HTML and it usually gets screwed up a lot :-P –  Neal Feb 7 '12 at 21:01
add comment
  • A looks like the standard hack-away style of combining PHP and HTML
  • B looks like a template for a native PHP template engine (e.g. Zend View)

It's really just a style-thing, however I prefer B in combination with a template engine.

share|improve this answer
add comment

While you might think that B is harder to read, it is actually easier to maintain. What you have there can be loosely described as a template.

When you start to embed HTML like version A in PHP, what happens if you need to change the look of your page later on? or what happens when you want to change the layout of your page?

By combining technologies like CSS, javascipt/jquery with your html, managing your site headers, footers and main content blocks becomes more organized.

I think you'll find using templates will make your life easier in the long run. Before you go off and think you need to wrap one on your own, there are many template engines to choose from.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Nothing, except the memory that PHP uses in storing those HTML strings. By not including the HTML in the PHP scripts you're ultimately reducing the size (and strain) of the PHP parser, because the PHP script that it reads will ultimately be smaller.

Version B is better, but only slightly. In most cases, you won't notice the difference.

share|improve this answer
add comment

There's no practical difference -- just a matter of style.

You might prefer the second way because you don't need to escape quotation marks, etc. in the HTML.

share|improve this answer
    
(downvoters, please explain) –  Ben Alpert Feb 7 '12 at 21:10
    
When thinking pragmatically, version A is inadvisable because it is hard to maintain. –  afuzzyllama Feb 7 '12 at 21:18
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.