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Using a tuple I would like to autorun a function passing the rest of the tuple as parameters. It's easier to understand what i'm trying to do if i show you what i have so far:

def Function1(var1,var2,post=False):
    if post: print "Function One "+str(var1)+str(var2)
    return "FN1"

def Function2(var1,var2,var3,var4,post=False):
    if post: print "Function Two "+str(var1)+str(var2)+str(var3)+str(var4)
    return "FN2"


pattern = ( ('Function1',1,2) , ('Function2',1,2,3,4) )
IDs = []

#the next line is the line i can't get working, i[0] is successfully calling
#but i can't get the tuple to pass (var,var,True)
#instead it passes to the function as ((var,var),True)
for i in pattern: IDs += eval(i[0])(i[1:],True)

print IDs

I want my output to be:

'''
Function One 12
Function Two 1234
["FN1","FN2"]
'''
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Why the downvote? It's answerable, and i've been researching it for a while now.. but am still stuck. In fact it was so answerable it took an experienced programmer only a couple minutes to solve the problem. –  Symon Feb 7 '12 at 21:11
2  
At a guess, someone probably didn't like the "don't tell me I'm doing it wrong just make it work" attitude in the initial draft. Personally, I'll upvote you just because you provided the expected output. –  Russell Borogove Feb 7 '12 at 21:15
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need three things:

  • The magic star operator to turn the list slice into separate arguments.
  • Making post a named argument so it doesn't conflict with the magic star.
  • Append instead of += to separate the returned strings properly.

So:

for i in pattern: 
    IDs.append( eval(i[0])(*i[1:],post=True) )

print IDs

Mandatory eval() Lecture: Experienced Python programmers consider eval() to be a dangerous last resort. You should look up functions by name in the local module's dictionary instead:

for i in pattern:
    # look up i[0] in the symbol dictionary of the current module
    fun = sys.modules[__name__].__dict__[ i[0] ]
    IDs.append( fun(*i[1:],post=True) )

It's even cleaner and easier if you can restrict the functions to be executed by name to methods within a class object; you need only reference yourObject.__dict__[ functionName ].

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the *Tips! –  Symon Feb 7 '12 at 21:48
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You don't mention how it isn't working, but this should do it for you:

for i in pattern: 
    IDs += eval(i[0])(*i[1:], post=True)

Note that there are better ways than eval to find a function from a string. If you don't have total control over those lists of tuples, then you are asking for trouble.

You shouldn't be so quick to preclude other ideas. You don't seem to have much Python knowledge yet, so other ideas might be really good. For example, instead of:

if post: print "Function Two "+str(var1)+str(var2)+str(var3)+str(var4)

why not the more readable:

if post: 
    print "Function Two %s %s %s %s" % (var1, var2, var3, var4)
share|improve this answer
    
Works like a charm, eval was the only way i could find, could you suggest something else? –  Symon Feb 7 '12 at 21:10
    
Ned, does this address that he was using IDs as a list? Or did he change that after you answered? –  jdi Feb 7 '12 at 21:15
    
Oh, i overlooked that. –  Ned Batchelder Feb 7 '12 at 21:22
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Using a lookup table (easier and more controlled than the local namespace even) instead of eval and appending to the list properly might look like this:

def Function1(var1,var2,post=False):
    if post:
        print "Function One "+str(var1)+str(var2)
    return "FN1"

def Function2(var1,var2,var3,var4,post=False):
    if post:
        print "Function Two "+str(var1)+str(var2)+str(var3)+str(var4)
    return "FN2"

allowableFunctions = {
    'Function1': Function1,
    'Function2': Function2,
}    

pattern = ( ('Function1',1,2) , ('Function2',1,2,3,4) )
IDs = []

for i in pattern:
    IDs.append(allowableFunctions[i[0]](*i[1:], post=True))

print IDs
share|improve this answer
    
What's the advantage of the lookup table over simply using Function1 directly in pattern instead of "Function1"? It doesn't seem like he's actually using the string for anything. –  DSM Feb 7 '12 at 21:31
    
Fair point. I suppose I figured that if he was eval'ing it, it was coming from a string at some point not captured in the example (perhaps read from stdin or a text file). If that's not the case than there's no gain from using the lookup table. –  mattbornski Feb 7 '12 at 21:38
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