Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms379570(v=vs.80).aspx

I know that Arrays in .net is stored in a contiguous fashion. ( in mem)

I also know that List<..> is not. ( well...not all list types... see at my 2'nd question)

From here I have 2 qustions


  1. I know that after 4,8,16... inserted items to a list - the list reallocate itself in memory.

    I also know I can send him the Capacity in ctor in order to let him know in what size im gonna create him ( to reduce re-allocation).

    The question is why ? he Doesn NOT store itself contiguously , so why does he care about re- allocating himself ? ( he doesnt have to find free & contiguous memory cells)

  2. why Does List with structs is allocated in contiguous memory, unlike a List of classes ?

share|improve this question
    
Missed that Oded.. sorry –  DJ KRAZE Feb 7 '12 at 21:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

List<T> does store memory contiguously. Internally, it uses an array for its storage. When you reach the capacity, a new array is allocated and the memory is copied.

This is true for List<T> instances of classes or structs. However, when T is a reference type (class), you're storing a contiguous list of references. The class instances cannot be contiguous as you can include a list which contains 100 references to the same instance of a class.

As such, to address your specific questions:

The question is why ? he Doesn NOT store itself contiguously , so why does he care about re- allocating himself ?

It does store the items contiguously, which is why the reallocation is required.

why Does List with structs is allocated in contiguous memory, unlike a List of classes?

Both are stored contiguously, but in the second case (classes) you're storing a list of references to a class instance.

share|improve this answer
    
If i crete a list with 1 item. and he doesnt have a contiguous place for the second onw - will he still reallocate himself ? –  Royi Namir Feb 7 '12 at 21:15
    
@RoyiNamir The list will reallocate as soon as you add an item beyond your current capacity. If you create the list with a capacity of 1, adding a second item will cause a reallocation. With classes, this isn't horrible, though, since you're only reallocating and copying the object references, not the object instances themselves. –  Reed Copsey Feb 7 '12 at 21:17
    
oh I didnt know that it still store contiguously in memory. thanks :)it always sat at my mind –  Royi Namir Feb 7 '12 at 21:25

1) all the object references are still stored contigously

2) a list och classes still must let the objects be stored like ordinary objects. thay cannot be forced into a contigious array - but the references to them can

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.