Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I came across this gist

(defun swap-windows ()
 "If you have 2 windows, it swaps them."
 (interactive)
 (cond ((not (= (count-windows) 2))
        (message "You need exactly 2 windows to do this."))
       (t
        (let* ((w1 (first (window-list)))
               (w2 (second (window-list)))
               (b1 (window-buffer w1))
               (b2 (window-buffer w2))
               (s1 (window-start w1))
               (s2 (window-start w2)))
          (set-window-buffer w1 b2)
          (set-window-buffer w2 b1)
          (set-window-start w1 s2)
          (set-window-start w2 s1)))))

today, which swaps the contents of the buffers in two windows, as long as there are exactly two windows. The problem for me is that I usually have ecb running, which creates 1 or more extra windows. I've never really done anything with elisp except tweak methods I get from other places, and this (hopefully) simple change is a bit above my current comprehension.

I spent some time looking through both the ecb information, and the emacs manual, but can't find a reasonable way to determine if there are exactly two non-ecb windows open.

I also tried using things like 'bury-buffer' on the ecb windows, so I could just assume the they wouldn't be at the front of the list, but that was a flawed approach to begin with.

So my question, is there a way to modify the gist to make it work with ecb? I'm assuming there is something special about ecb windows, but I couldn't find anything I could access.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I also tried using things like 'bury-buffer' on the ecb windows, so I could just assume the they wouldn't be at the front of the list, but that was a flawed approach to begin with.

Bit of a hack, but you can hide the ECB windows, call swap-windows, and show them again, like so:

(defun my-swap-windows ()
  (interactive)
  (ecb-hide-ecb-windows)
  (swap-windows)
  (ecb-show-ecb-windows))

By the way, I had to add this line to get the gist to work:

(require 'cl)

Edit: I wasn't seeing the window resizing problem you described, but this code should swap non-ECB windows while ignoring ECB windows.

(require 'cl)

(defun non-ecb-window-list ()
  (remove-if
   #'(lambda (window)
       (find (window-buffer window) (ecb-dedicated-special-buffers)))
   (window-list)))

(defun count-non-ecb-windows ()
  (length (non-ecb-window-list)))

(defun swap-windows ()
 "If you have 2 windows, it swaps them."
 (interactive)
 (cond ((not (= (count-non-ecb-windows) 2))
        (message "You need exactly 2 windows to do this."))
       (t
        (let* ((w1 (first (non-ecb-window-list)))
               (w2 (second (non-ecb-window-list)))
               (b1 (window-buffer w1))
               (b2 (window-buffer w2))
               (s1 (window-start w1))
               (s2 (window-start w2)))
          (set-window-buffer w1 b2)
          (set-window-buffer w2 b1)
          (set-window-start w1 s2)
          (set-window-start w2 s1)))))
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm...a possibility for sure. At first blush, it appears to resize my windows though. Or rather, an even split remain even when hiding, but one (first? left?) window remain the same width when ecb windows are shown again, while the other shrinks. –  Ckhrysze Feb 8 '12 at 16:21
    
I've updated my answer, as I say there, my ECB windows weren't being resized, but the new code is probably closer to what you want. –  Luke Girvin Feb 8 '12 at 18:36
    
Awesome, thank you! I think perhaps we are using different version of emacs (and to be honest, I'm not entirely sure what version I'm using...I'm on a mac, and followed some 24 version instructions somewhere using brew, beyond that, I couldn't say off hand). –  Ckhrysze Feb 8 '12 at 19:35

I'll go ahead and post this answer, as I wrote/discovered it with some more trial and error. It isn't what I asked for, which the accepted answer is, but it has its own merits for others reading this thread.

(defun swap-windows ()
 "Swap two windows."
 (interactive)
 (let* ((w1 (selected-window))
    (w2 (next-window))
    (b1 (window-buffer w1))
    (b2 (window-buffer w2))
    (s1 (window-start w1))
    (s2 (window-start w2)))
   (set-window-buffer w1 b2)
   (set-window-buffer w2 b1)
   (set-window-start w1 s2)
   (set-window-start w2 s1)))

Since I basically always know what C-x o will go to, which is what 'next-window' is supposed to return, this function is almost always what I want. However, it leaves off any kind of error checking, and doesn't really answer the question as written, just my poorly expressed intent.

share|improve this answer
    
After some further experimentation, 'next-window' does not always return the window 'C-x o' would have taken me to, making this even less useful than I at first thought. –  Ckhrysze Feb 8 '12 at 19:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.