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I am trying to add support for different languages to existing MVC 3 application. So far my links were

oldUrl -> myapp.com/Item/Details/5/some-title

And there are links to the website from different places on the web. But now I want to change the URL so the language is included:

newUrl -> kmyapp.com/en/Item/Details/5/some-title

However I want the oldUrl links to be valid. And the question is how do I do this... The easiest way would be to add another route, but I already have too many of them and it is getting kind of ugly, and when I create urls from a page that doesn't have the language the links also don't have the language so I have to do something else then.

Another way would be to override something that stands just before MVC tries to map the request to a specific route, but has already parsed the request url and filled the routeValues dictionary. So I can just check for the language and if it is not included in the route parameters I can add it on my own and call the implementation of the parent class to continue. Is that possible? What should I look at - UrlRoutingModule, MvcHttpHandler or something else? What can I override and how to tell MVC to use my version?

Any other ideas would be also appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
Couldn't you simply add a 2nd route with say {lang} segment and set it to be UrlParameter.Optional ? –  Denis Ivin Feb 7 '12 at 22:28
    
It doesn't really matter if its optional or not. But if the new route comes before the old one it actually works and the links are valid. The problem is that in this case I don't have the language in the url and my language switching mechanism kind of relies on that (all happens in a child action so I cant' access the controller and the action that are used for the current page and build a new link for the same page). That's the reason I want to find out how to override a bit the behavior of the engine. –  Draganov Feb 8 '12 at 9:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Another way would be to override something that stands just before MVC tries to map the request to a specific route, but has already parsed the request url and filled the routeValues dictionary. So I can just check for the language and if it is not included in the route parameters I can add it on my own and call the implementation of the parent class to continue. Is that possible?

Yes It is possible.

You can Override GetRouteData in RouteBase which will have URL details in it.

public override RouteData GetRouteData(HttpContextBase httpContext)
{
        string url = httpContext.Request.AppRelativeCurrentExecutionFilePath;
}

and in global.aspx add below code.

public static void RegisterRoutes(RouteCollection routes)
{
    routes.IgnoreRoute("{resource}.axd/{*pathInfo}");

    routes.Add(new MyUrlRoute()); // Add before your default Routes

    routes.MapRoute(
        "Default", // Route name
        "{controller}/{action}/{id}", // URL with parameters
        new { controller = "Home", action = "Index", id = UrlParameter.Optional } // Parameter defaults
    );

For more detailed implementation - refer blog url-manipulation-implementing-routebase.html

share|improve this answer
    
As per your solution they should actually use custom route for old URLs without language segment and not the other way around as your routing suggests... –  Robert Koritnik Feb 9 '12 at 12:13
    
just a another way to override something that stands just before MVC tries to map the request to a specific route, –  swapneel Feb 9 '12 at 15:43
    
It looks that I will have to deal with all the params and I believe the standard MVC routing will do better job than me inplementing this. I only wanted to add the language, but MVC probably maps the params based on the existing routes and whatever I write in GetRouteData might not work for some routes that I will add at some point in the future. However thats very close to what I was asking for! Thanks a lot for this! –  Draganov Feb 9 '12 at 20:47

There are of course many solutions. I'm going to show you two:

  • one that you control in your application
  • one that you control outside of your application (on IIS)

Solution one - Asp.net MVC routing

Provide routing that covers old and new routing:

routes.MapRoute(
    "New",
    "{lang}/{controller}/{action}/{id}",
    new { lang = "en", controller = "Home", action = "Index", id = UrlParameter.Optional },
    new { lang = "en|de|it|es|fr" }
);
routes.MapRoute(
    "NewEx",
    "{lang}/{controller}/{action}/{id}/{title}",
    new { lang = "en", controller = "Home", action = "Index", id = UrlParameter.Optional, title = UrlParameter.Optional },
    new { lang = "en|de|it|es|fr" }
);

routes.MapRoute(
    "Old",
    "{controller}/{action}/{id}",
    new { lang = "en", controller = "Home", action = "Index", id = UrlParameter.Optional }
);
routes.MapRoute(
    "OldEx",
    "{controller}/{action}/{id}/{title}",
    new { lang = "en", controller = "Home", action = "Index", id = UrlParameter.Optional, title = UrlParameter.Optional }
);

As you can see I've provided language default for the old routes as well since it's not present in the URL. Whether you want that or not is your own decision but this kind of routing makes it possible to not duplicate your controller actions. In any case you'd have to define a default language which can be provided this way.

There's a bigger question whether you still want to support old URLs or you'd rather redirect them (HTTP Redirect Permanent Status 301).

Permanent redirection

Change old routes to:

routes.MapRoute(
    "Old",
    "{controllerOld}/{actionOld}/{idOld}",
    new { controller = "Redirect", action = "Permanent", id = UrlParameter.Optional }
);
routes.MapRoute(
    "OldEx",
    "{controllerOld}/{actionOld}/{idOld}/{titleOld}",
    new { controller = "Redirect", action = "Permanent", id = UrlParameter.Optional, title = UrlParameter.Optional }
);

Then write a controller class that does redirection:

public class RedirectController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult Permanent(string controllerOld, string actionOld, string idOld, string titleOld)
    {
        return RedirectToRoutePermanent(new {
            lang = "en",
            controller = controllerOld,
            action = actionOld,
            id = idOld,
            title = titleOld
        });
    }
}

Solution two - IIS URL rewriting module

This solution relies on IIS URL Rewriting module, where you could rewrite any requests without language selection to your preferred default.

I'm not going to wrote how URL Rewriting works here, because there're plenty of web resources with detailed info about that.

share|improve this answer
1  
Great answer! Thanks a lot! I think I will stick to adding one more route. Thanks again! +1 –  Draganov Feb 9 '12 at 20:49

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