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When visiting this site: https://campus.ayy.fi and submitting the login http POST request, I found in cookie collection two google analytics related keys: __utma, __utmz. I searched into the html code and js script for that page and didn't find any evidence that google analytics script is embedded (e.g. "ga.js"). So my question is why there are still google analytics cookies in the request and who added them?

Thank you!

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Well after visiting the website mentioned I coudn´t idenfity any http requests to google analytics and also no evidence of the GA code installed on the page.

My assumption is that the "cookie collection" you are reffering to is the collection of cookies on your machine, and if that website has had any GA code installed before and you visited the page, the cookies will stay on your machine for some time (as long as 2 years for _utma and 6 months for _utmz).

The easiest way to check that is to clean your cookies and open the webpage once again. If you really want to digg in, you can use HTTPFox (enable it, click "start" when you visit the page and in the search field type "utm"). In this way, you can see every request beign sent by the webpage. (Although I did use this proccess and there really are no requests to GA).

-Augusto Roselli

Web Analytics - dp6

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Sorry that the request is posted after further login submission on this page. I'll have a look at pages in the same cookie domain. I'll also clear all the cookies and do the same submission again and see what'll happen. Thank you! – Felix Yao Feb 9 '12 at 21:52

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