Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

This follows on from this question:

Algorithm to generate spanning set

Given this input: [1,2,3,4]

I'd like to generate this set of sets in python:

[1] [2] [3] [4]
[1] [2] [3,4]
[1] [2, 3, 4]
[1] [2,3] [4]
[1,2] [3] [4]
[1,2] [3,4]
[1,2,3] [4]
[1,2,3,4]

So unlike the previous question, the order of the list is retained.

Ideally the code would work for n items in the list

Thanks very much

EDIT 2: Could anyone advise me on how to do this if the original input is a string rather than a list (where each word in the string becomes an item in a list). Thanks!

EDIT: added [1] [2, 3, 4] Sorry for the mistake

share|improve this question
2  
What have you tried so far? – Niklas B. Feb 7 '12 at 22:42
4  
Did you forgot the set [1] [2,3,4] ? – blacklwhite Feb 7 '12 at 22:42
2  
Why is there no [1], [2, 3, 4] in the output? – Sven Marnach Feb 7 '12 at 22:43
3  
What you're trying to do was something like the part 1 of the question Python: show all possible groupings of a list. – Rik Poggi Feb 7 '12 at 22:46
    
It is somewhat like that. Although I'd hope to generalise to splitting the list into 'up to n' parts – user1195889 Feb 7 '12 at 23:39
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You might also enjoy a recursive solution:

def span(lst):
  yield [lst]
  for i in range(1, len(lst)):
    for x in span(lst[i:]):
      yield [lst[:i]] + x

Explanation

We exploit recursion here to break the problem down. The approach is the following:

For every list, the whole list is a valid spanning: [1,2,3,4] => [[1,2,3,4]].

For every list that is longer than size 1, we can use the first item as a group and then apply the same algorithm on the remaining list to get all the combined results:

[1,2,3] => 
  [[1]] + [[2], [3]]  # => [[1], [2], [3]]
  [[1]] + [[2,3]]     # => [[1], [2,3]]

For every list that is longer than size 2, we can just as well use the first two items as a group and then apply the same algorithm on the remaining list and combine the results:

[1,2,3,4,5] =>
  [[1,2]] + [[3], [4], [5]]  # => [[1,2], [3], [4], [5]]
  [[1,2]] + [[3,4], [5]]     # => [[1,2], [3,4], [5]]
  [[1,2]] + [[3], [4,5]]     # => [[1,2], [3], [4,5]]
  [[1,2]] + [[3,4,5]]        # => [[1,2], [3,4,5]]

We can see that the possible combinations on the right side are indeed all possible groupings of the remainder of the list, [3,4,5].

For every list that is longer than ... etc. Thus, the final algorithm is the following:

  1. yield the whole list (it is always a valid spanning, see above)
  2. For every possible splitting of the list, yield the left-hand part of the list combined with all possible spannings of the right-hand part of the list.

yield is a special keyword in Python that make the function a generator, which means that it returns a iterable object that can be used to enumerate all results found. You can transform the result into a list using the list constructor function: list(span([1,2,3,4])).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this – user1195889 Feb 7 '12 at 23:40
    
@user1195889: If your question is answered, you can accept one of the answers to close it, by using the tick button on the left side :) – Niklas B. Feb 7 '12 at 23:43
    
Can I just take a couple of hours to work through them, then I will do so :) – user1195889 Feb 8 '12 at 0:37
    
@user: Fair enough :) Have fun! – Niklas B. Feb 8 '12 at 0:54
    
Would you be able to explain a little how this works to a novice - just a couple of lines in prose? Don't worry though if you don't have time – user1195889 Feb 8 '12 at 11:30

Adjusting one of the solution from Python: show all possible groupings of a list:

from itertools import combinations

def cut(lst, indexes):
    last = 0
    for i in indexes:
        yield lst[last:i]
        last = i
    yield lst[last:]

def generate(lst, n):
    for indexes in combinations(list(range(1,len(lst))), n - 1):
        yield list(cut(lst, indexes))

data = [1,2,3,4]

for i in range(1, len(data)+1):  # the only difference is here
    for g in generate(data, i):
        print(g)

"""
[[1, 2, 3, 4]]
[[1], [2, 3, 4]]
[[1, 2], [3, 4]]
[[1, 2, 3], [4]]
[[1], [2], [3, 4]]
[[1], [2, 3], [4]]
[[1, 2], [3], [4]]
[[1], [2], [3], [4]]
"""
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this is really helpful – user1195889 Feb 8 '12 at 0:36
import itertools
a = [1, 2, 3, 4]
n = len(a)
for num_splits in range(n):
    for splits in itertools.combinations(range(1, n), num_splits):
        splices = zip([0] + list(splits), list(splits) + [n])
        print([a[i:j] for i, j in splices])

prints

[[1, 2, 3, 4]]
[[1], [2, 3, 4]]
[[1, 2], [3, 4]]
[[1, 2, 3], [4]]
[[1], [2], [3, 4]]
[[1], [2, 3], [4]]
[[1, 2], [3], [4]]
[[1], [2], [3], [4]]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much, this is great! – user1195889 Feb 7 '12 at 23:40

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.