Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm wondering if there's a difference in using size_t and container::size_type?

What I understand is size_t is more generic and can be used for any size_types..

Is container::size_type more optimized for a specific container though?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 51 down vote accepted

The standard containers define size_type as a typedef to Allocator::size_type (Allocator is a template parameter), which for std::allocator is defined to be size_t. So for the standard case, they are the same.

However, if you use a custom allocator a different underlying type could be used. So container::size_type is preferable for maximum portability.

share|improve this answer
    
s/maximum portability/maximum generality/ –  Thomas Eding Apr 1 at 22:01
  • size_t is defined as the type used for the size of an object and is platform dependent
  • container::size_type is the type that is used for the number of elements in the container and is container dependent

All std containers use size_t as the size_type but other library vendors choose a type that they find appropriate for their container.
If you look at the Qt, the size_type of Qt containers is version dependent in Qt3 it was unsigned int and in Qt4 they changed it to int.

share|improve this answer
    
I find it a bit odd to have the size of something expressed as an int. Could we ever have a negative size for a container? –  Mihai Todor Jun 22 '12 at 13:14
3  
@MihaiTodor: it's not unusual for people to use signed types for everything, I guess Qt is following suit. The reason is that mixed operations (in particular comparisons) are such a disaster area that many people would rather avoiding using unsigned types for numbers, than have to deal with and/or avoid mixed ops. Just because unsigned types can't express negative numbers, doesn't mean you have to use them for numbers that can't be negative :-) I confess I'm surprised it's int rather than ssize_t, int is kind of small. –  Steve Jessop Sep 19 '12 at 16:22
    
@Steve Yes, you have a point. Thanks. –  Mihai Todor Sep 19 '12 at 16:24

For std::[w]string, std::[w]string::size_type is equal to std::allocator<T>::size_type, which is equal to the std::size_t. For other containers, it's some implementation defined unsigned integer type.

Sometimes it's useful to have the exact type, so for example one knows where the type wraps around to (like, to UINT_MAX) so that one can make use of that. Or for templates, where you really need to pass two identical types to function/class templates.

Often i find i use size_t for brevity or iterators anyway. In generic code, since you generally don't know with what container instance your template is used and what size those containers have, you will have to use the Container::size_type typedef if you need to store the containers size.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.