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I'm new to programming, and I'm trying to write a Python function to find the inverse of a permutation on {1,2,3,...,n} using the following code:

def inv(str):
    result = []
    i = list(str).index(min(list(str)))
    while min(list(str)) < len(list(str)) + 1:
        list(str)[i : i + 1] = [len(list(str)) + 1]
        result.append(i + 1)
    return result

However, when I try to use the function, inv('<mypermutation>') returns []. Am I missing something? Is Python skipping over my while loop for some syntactical reason I don't understand? None of my google and stackoverflow searches on topics I think of are returning anything helpful.

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4  
Don't name a variable str; it's a built-in. –  Wooble Feb 7 '12 at 23:41
5  
"When in doubt, print more out." –  Greg Hewgill Feb 7 '12 at 23:41
    
I tried renaming 'str' as 'permutation' and it still returned '[]'. Any other tips? –  Fingolfin Feb 7 '12 at 23:44
3  
@Fingolfin: Oh, wait, are you literally executing inv('<mypermutation>')? Then the while conditions compares a string to an integer, which might have a False result, depending on the version the Python you use. In Python 3, for example, you'll get an error. –  WolframH Feb 8 '12 at 0:13
2  
Fingolfin, I think you need to show a literal, unmodified example of how you call this function to help people figure this out. –  David Z Feb 8 '12 at 0:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you only want the inverse permutation, you can use

def inv(perm):
    inverse = [0] * len(perm)
    for i, p in enumerate(perm):
        inverse[p] = i
    return inverse

perm = [3, 0, 2, 1]
print(inv(perm))
for i in perm:
    print(inv(perm)[i])

[1, 3, 2, 0]
0
1
2
3
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Correct me if I have this wrong, but I think the problem with my code comes when I change str to a list: str is a string, and list(str) is a list of string elements. However, since string elements can't be numerically compared to numbers, the code fails to produce a result (other than []).

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