Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am currently implementing a runtime (i.e. a collection of functions) for a formulas language. Some formulas need a context to be passed to them and I created a class called EvaluationContext which contains all properties I need access to at runtime.

Using ThreadLocal<EvaluationContext> seems like a good option to make this context available to the runtime functions. The other option is to pass the context as a parameter to the functions that need it.

I prefer using ThreadLocal but I was wondering if there is any performance penalty as opposed to passing the evaluation context via method parameters.

share|improve this question
    
Have you thought about a usability penalty from ThreadLocal<> ? What if a consumer of your library is multithreaded? – Eugen Rieck Feb 8 '12 at 0:18
    
@Eugen Rieck - I suppose they could serialize all calls through a single actor thread but the run time itself may already be thread safe and thus this would add considerable overhead for a minor convenience. – ChaosPandion Feb 8 '12 at 0:27
    
@Eugen Rieck- I am not too sure I understand what you mean when you say "usability penalty". The consumer of my library is multi-threaded, however, the request for computing one formula will happen on one thread within one context. But I could invoke the same runtime function from different threads hence the need to set the context for each thread. The runtime functions are thread safe by the virtue of having everything they need via parameters and possibly this ThreadLocal context member. – costa Feb 8 '12 at 0:40
1  
@costa By using ThreadLocal<> you force all consumers of the library to make all calls for one context to come from one thread. This might be not so straightforward as it seams - UI threads and friends come to mind. Giving the context as a parameter shifts this burden. – Eugen Rieck Feb 8 '12 at 0:45
    
+1 for @EugenRieck - ThreadLocal is a bit of a mess - it's too inflexible and restricts options for maintenance/enhancement. You should avoid it if at all possible. – Martin James Feb 8 '12 at 1:02
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I created the program below and it is faster to use parameters rather than the ThreadLocal field.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

namespace TestThreadLocal
{
  internal class Program
  {
    public class EvaluationContext
    {
      public int A { get; set; }
      public int B { get; set; }
    }

    public static class FormulasRunTime
    {
      public static ThreadLocal<EvaluationContext> Context = new ThreadLocal<EvaluationContext>();

      public static int SomeFunction()
      {
        EvaluationContext ctx = Context.Value;
        return ctx.A + ctx.B;
      }

      public static int SomeFunction(EvaluationContext context)
      {
        return context.A + context.B;
      }
    }



    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {

      Stopwatch stopwatch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
      int N = 10000;
      Task<int>[] tasks = new Task<int>[N];
      int sum = 0;
      for (int i = 0; i < N; i++)
      {
        int x = i;
        tasks[i] = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
                                                 {
                                                   //Console.WriteLine("Starting {0}, thread {1}", x, Thread.CurrentThread.ManagedThreadId);
                                                   FormulasRunTime.Context.Value = new EvaluationContext {A = 0, B = x};
                                                   return FormulasRunTime.SomeFunction();
                                                 });
        sum += i;
      }
      Task.WaitAll(tasks);

      Console.WriteLine("Using ThreadLocal: It took {0} millisecs and the sum is {1}", stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds, tasks.Sum(t => t.Result));
      Console.WriteLine(sum);
      stopwatch = Stopwatch.StartNew();

      for (int i = 0; i < N; i++)
      {
        int x = i;
        tasks[i] = Task.Factory.StartNew(() =>
        {
          return FormulasRunTime.SomeFunction(new EvaluationContext { A = 0, B = x });
        });

      }
      Task.WaitAll(tasks);

      Console.WriteLine("Using parameter: It took {0} millisecs and the sum is {1}", stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds, tasks.Sum(t => t.Result));
      Console.ReadKey();
    }
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Going on costa's answer;

If you try N as 10000000,

int N = 10000000;

you will see there is not much of a difference (around 107.4 to 103.4 seconds).

If the value gets bigger the difference becomes smaller.

So, if you do not mind a three seconds slowness, i think it is the difference between the usability and the taste.

PS: In the code, int return types must be converted to long.

share|improve this answer

There will not be any performance impact, but you will not be able to do any parallel computations in this case (which can be quite useful especially in formulas domain). If you definitely don't want to do it you can go for ThreadLocal.

Otherwise I would suggest you look at the "state monad" "pattern" that will allow you to seamlessly pass your state (context) through your computations (formulas) without having any explicit parameters.

share|improve this answer
    
This looks interesting. I am going to look at it... – costa Feb 8 '12 at 0:50
    
There will be a performance impact! Thread locality is not free. It is implemented using a pointer indirection to a special processor register. – usr Feb 8 '12 at 22:56
    
Not really sure why you think a pointer indirection is particularly slow but in any case it's got nothing to do with a "special processor register". You can simply store TLS stuff at the base of the thread's stack. Most Java implementations these days simply store it in a dictionary hanging off Thread.currentThread(). – tumtumtum Dec 31 '13 at 12:05

I think you'll find that in a head-to-head comparison, accessing a ThreadLocal<> takes substantially longer than accessing a parameter, but in the end it might not be a significant difference - it all depends what else you're doing.

share|improve this answer

I consider the ThreadLocal design to be dirty, yet creative. It is definitely going to be faster to use parameters but performance should not be your only concern. Parameters will be much clearer to understand. I recommend you go with parameters.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.