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My Xcode crash log points to this line of code where it is crashing:

if(contentDict != nil && [contentDict count] > 0) {

I would have thought that this could not crash, since it is checking for 'nil' first, and with the '&&' it would not check any further. Could it be failing on the previous line? I have 2 crash logs that point to the exact same line number. Below is the method it comes from:

    - (NSInteger)numberOfSectionsInTableView:(UITableView *)tableView {
channelIndex = [[NSMutableArray alloc] init];

BOOL reachable = [self networkReachable];
if (!reachable) {
    NSData *data = [[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] objectForKey:kContent];       
    contentDict = [NSKeyedUnarchiver unarchiveObjectWithData:data];
    if(contentDict == nil || [contentDict count] == 0) {
        contentDict = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init];
    }
    data = [[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] objectForKey:kHistory];       
    historyDict = [NSKeyedUnarchiver unarchiveObjectWithData:data];
    if(historyDict == nil || [historyDict count] == 0) {
        historyDict = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] init];
    }
}

if(selectedIndex == 0) {
    if(contentDict != nil && [contentDict count] > 0) {
        NSArray *keys = [contentDict allKeys];
        keys = [keys sortedArrayUsingSelector: @selector (compare:)];  
        for (NSString *key in keys) {
            NSLog(@"%@ is %@",key, [contentDict objectForKey:key]);
            Content *content = [contentDict objectForKey:key];
            if (![channelIndex containsObject:content.channelName])
            {            
                [channelIndex addObject:content.channelName];
            }        
        }
    }
} else {
    if(historyDict != nil && [historyDict count] > 0) {
        NSArray *keys = [historyDict allKeys];
        keys = [keys sortedArrayUsingSelector: @selector (compare:)];  
        for (NSString *key in keys) {
            NSLog(@"%@ is %@",key, [historyDict objectForKey:key]);
            Content *content = [historyDict objectForKey:key];
            if (![channelIndex containsObject:content.channelName])
            {            
                [channelIndex addObject:content.channelName];
            }        
        }
    }
}
return [channelIndex count];

}

share|improve this question

[NSKeyedUnarchiver unarchiveObjectWithData:data] returns an autoreleased object. Possibly that's your issue. Try to retain the result before you use it. Checking for nil won't help you if the variable points to a memory region that contains garbage because it has been auto-released.

share|improve this answer
    
I am assuming that I need to do this: contentDict = [[NSKeyedUnarchiver unarchiveObjectWithData:data]retain]; – beachbeamer Feb 8 '12 at 3:06
    
Is it necessary to remove the "retain" attribute from my property? – beachbeamer Feb 8 '12 at 3:15
    
Lastly, it does not make sense to me that I would need to do that, since it just grabbed the objects from NSUserDefaults, and NSKeydUnarchiver was putting these deserialized objects into the NSMutableDictionary. – beachbeamer Feb 8 '12 at 3:24
    
See @jlehr's answer: You're using the instance variable, not the property. If you use self.contentDict = ... then you don't need to call retain on the result of unarchiveObjectWithData because your property takes care of that (retains it). If you access the ivar directly (as you're doing in your code), you need to call retain because you are bypassing the setter. – Johannes Fahrenkrug Feb 8 '12 at 22:38

The code you provided is only setting the contentDict instance variable when the network is not reachable, so the first question would be: how is it getting set when the network is reachable? In all likelihood, it's being set somewhere else and not properly retained, so the dictionary is getting deallocated before you do the check.

Here are some suggestions:

  1. Prefix your instance variables with an underscore, e.g. _contentDict rather than contentDict.
  2. Avoid directly referencing instance variables in methods other than init..., dealloc, and getter/setter pairs. Use properties instead.
  3. Don't bother checking for nil -- it's irrelevant here (messages to nil return zero for all non-struct return types).
  4. Make sure you understand the rules for memory management. If you're compiling with ARC enabled: Advanced Memory Mangement Programming Guide; Otherwise: Transitioning to ARC Release Notes.
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