Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to use a linq expression to validate a phone number in my MVC code. The code looks something like this:

class Person
{
    public HomePhone { get; set; }
}

class Employee
{
    public WorkPhone { get; set; }
}

class Office
{
    Employee Boss { get; set; }
}

class PersonController : Controller
{
    private static ValidatePhoneNumber<M>(Exression<Func<M,string>> propExpr)
    {
        var member = prop.Body as MemberExpression;
        if (member == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("expression must be a member expression, i.e., x => x.MyProperty");
        }

        var propInfo = member.Member as PropertyInfo;
        if (propInfo == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("expression is not a property type.");
        }

        var getter = propExpr.Compile();
        string phoneStr = getter(); //this doesn't work

        if( !/* ... phoneStr is valid phone number */ )
        {
            var propName = propInfo.Name;
            ModelState[propName] = "invalid format for phone number";
        }
    }

    public ActionResult Create(Person p)
    {
        ValidatePhoneNumber( p => p.HomePhone );
                    if( ModelState.IsValid )
                    ....
    }

    public ActionResult CreatOffice(Office o)
    {
        ValidatePhoneNumber( o => o.Boss.WorkPhone );
                    if( ModelState.IsValid )
                    ....
    }
}

I can't quite get a handle on the syntax needed here. What do I need to do to have have a function where I pass in a member property expression, and have access to the name of that property as well as the value of it.

share|improve this question
    
I don't think the code you provided will compile (and no I'm not talking about the ....). Is this actual code you've tried to solve your problem with? –  M.Babcock Feb 8 '12 at 0:37
    
Why do you want to reinvent the wheel when there are so many methods to validate properties? –  Eranga Feb 8 '12 at 0:40

2 Answers 2

You can get what it seems that you want with Reflection alone.

namespace Forums.LinqToValidatePhoneNumberProperty
{
    using System;
    using System.Linq;
    using System.Reflection;
    using System.Text.RegularExpressions;

    public class PhoneNumberRule
    {
        #region Fields

        static string _usPhonePattern = @"1?\W*([2-9][0-8][0-9])" +
                                        @"\W*([2-9][0-9]{2})\W*" +
                                        @"([0-9]{4})(\se?x?t?(\d*))?";
        static Regex _usPhoneRegex = new Regex( _usPhonePattern );

        #endregion Fields

        #region Methods

        public static void Validate( object target, string propertyName )
        {
            Type targetType = target.GetType();
            PropertyInfo targetProperty = 
                ( from propertyInfo in targetType.GetProperties()
                where ( propertyInfo.Name == propertyName
                && propertyInfo.PropertyType.IsAssignableFrom(  
                    typeof (string ) ) )
                select propertyInfo ).First();

            if ( targetProperty == null )
            {
                throw new InvalidOperationException( "No appropriate property " +
                                                     "could be found on the " + 
                                                     "target object." );
            }

            string testValue = targetProperty.GetValue( target, null ) as string;

            if ( testValue != null && _usPhoneRegex.IsMatch( testValue ) )
            {
                return;
            }
            else
            {
                ModelState[propertyName] = "Not a valid phone number format";
            }
        }

        #endregion Methods
    }
}

A more robust solution might be to use a combination of reflection and custom attributes.

    public class PhoneNumberRule
    {
        #region Fields

        static string _usPhonePattern = @"1?\W*([2-9][0-8][0-9])" +
                                        @"\W*([2-9][0-9]{2})\W*" +
                                        @"([0-9]{4})(\se?x?t?(\d*))?";
        static Regex _usPhoneRegex = new Regex( _usPhonePattern );

        #endregion Fields

        #region Methods

        public static void ValidateProperties( object target )
        {
            Type targetType = target.GetType( );
            var phoneNumberProperties =
                from propertyInfo in targetType.GetProperties( )
                where propertyInfo.GetCustomAttributes(
                    typeof( PhoneNumberAttribute ), true ).Length > 0
                select propertyInfo;
            foreach ( PropertyInfo targetProperty in phoneNumberProperties )
            {
                string value = targetProperty.GetValue( target, null) as string;
                if ( value == null || !_usPhoneRegex.IsMatch( value ) )
                {
                    ModelState[ targetProperty.Name ] = "Not a valid phone number format";
                }
            }
        }

    }

    [AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property)]
    public class PhoneNumberAttribute : Attribute
    {
    }

    public class Person
    {
        [PhoneNumber( )]
        public string HomePhone { get; set; }
    }
share|improve this answer

The p and o you declare in the Create and CreatOffice methods are not the same as the p and o you declare in your lambda expression. In fact you should be getting an error because the identifier already exists in the current scope.

I would modify your method to be an extension method. (It will need to be defined in a static class)

public static ValidatePhoneNumber<M>(this M obj, Expression<Func<M,string>> propExpr)

you can then access the property value from 'obj'. Getting the value would be something like...

propertyInfo.GetValue(obj, null);

Your usage would then be modified to...

public ActionResult Create(Person p)
{
    p.ValidatePhoneNumber( person => person.HomePhone );
                if( ModelState.IsValid )
                ....
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.