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Going through Ember.js documentation, I am not able to figure out how to create nested models. Assume that I have the following JSON:

App.jsonObject = {
    id: 1812,
    name: 'Brokerage Account',
    positions: [
        {
            symbol: 'AAPL',
            quantity: '300'
        },
        {
            symbol: 'GOOG',
            quantity: '500'
        }
    ]
}

If I create a model object like this

App.account = Ember.Object.create(App.jsonObject);

only the top level properties (id and name) get bound to templates, the nested positions array does not get bound correctly. As a result adding, deleting or updating positions does not affect the display. Is there a manual or automatic way to transform the positions array so that it is binding aware (similar to an ObservableCollection in WPF)?

I have created a jsfiddle to experiment with this: http://jsfiddle.net/nareshbhatia/357sg/. As you can see, changes to top level properties are reflected in the output, but any change to the positions is not. I would greatly appreciate any hints on how to do this.

Thanks.

Naresh

Edit: The ideal situation would be if Ember.js could somehow parse my JSON feed into nested Ember.js objects. For example, what if I explicitly define my classes as follows, could that assist Ember.js to create the right objects?

App.Account = Ember.Object.extend({
    id: null,
    name: null,
    positions: Ember.ArrayProxy.create()
});

App.Position = Ember.Object.extend({
    symbol: null,
    quantity: null,
    lastTrade: null
});

App.account = App.Account.create(App.jsonObject);

My eventual goal is to display this structure in a hierarchical grid which can expand/collapse at the account level. Coming from the WPF/Silverlight world, it is fairly easy to do something like this. All you need to do is to specify a nested template for the grid in XAML and it knows how to interpret your model. You can find an example here - it is not too difficult to follow. I am wondering if something like this is possible in Ember.js.

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I'm not very familiar with WPF or it's controls (haven't worked w/ it in almost 4 years), but it looks like something like that should be not too bad to implement in Ember & Handlebars. –  Roy Daniels Feb 8 '12 at 18:22

2 Answers 2

You need to use pushObject not push when adding to Ember array objects with bindings. And you should probably use get() when accessing the positions property. See my jsFiddle for the corrections.

http://jsfiddle.net/ud3323/Y5nG5/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. This is very useful as it allows me to treat positions as a first-class property. However, it still does not solve the problem with properties at the nested level (the one commented line near the end of my fiddle). I have edited my question to clarify my higher level goal. I would be really interested on your take on that. Thanks again. –  Naresh Feb 8 '12 at 2:34
    
For a nested array you'll have to iterate over the array and create Ember objects out of each of them. I don't think there is anything built into Ember that does this for you. –  Roy Daniels Feb 8 '12 at 18:16
    
is this fiddle gone? –  Qrilka Mar 13 '12 at 18:32
    
@Qrilka Don't know how that happened... I've corrected the link. –  Roy Daniels Mar 13 '12 at 19:53
2  
@Rajat That should be a separate question as it really doesn't have anything to do with the original question or solution. But enough with the StackOverflow etiquette, take a look at this jsFiddle –  Roy Daniels Apr 23 '12 at 15:19

I've created a recursive object factory that you may like:

It will iterate over the object and create Ember Arrays or nested objects, returning a full Ember Object tree!

Here is the source for your reference, and a JS fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/SEGwy/2/

Please note: the fiddle writes the output to the console, so you won't see any output on the screen.

  RecursiveObject = {

      // http://javascriptweblog.wordpress.com/2011/08/08/fixing-the-javascript-typeof-operator/
      TypeOf: function (input) {
          try {
              return Object.prototype.toString.call(input).match(/^\[object\s(.*)\]$/)[1].toLowerCase();
          } catch (e) {
              return typeof input;
          }
      },

      // Factory method..
      create: function (args) {

          args = args || {};
          ctxt = this;

          switch (this.TypeOf(args)) {

              // Return an Ember Array
              case "array":

                  var result = Ember.A();

                  for (var i = 0; i < args.length; i++) {
                      x = this.create(args[i]);
                      result.push(x);
                  };

                  break;

              // Or a recursive object.
              case "object":

                  var result = Ember.Object.create();

                  $.each(args, function (key, value) {

                      result.set(key, ctxt.create(value));

                  });

                  break;

              default:

                  // Or just return the args.
                  result = args;
                  break;

          }

          return result;

      }

  }

  // Example

  jsonObject = {
    id: 1812,
    name: 'Brokerage Account',
    positions: [
        {
            symbol: 'AAPL',
            quantity: '300'
        },
        {
            symbol: 'GOOG',
            quantity: '500'
        }
    ]
  }

  x = RecursiveObject.create(jsonObject);
  console.log(x);
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