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char ch;
//Get data from user 
cout << "Enter your sentence on one line followed by a # to end it: " << endl;

while (cin >> character && character != '#') 
{
    cin.get(ch); 
    ch = static_cast<char>(toupper(ch));
    outFile << ch;

    if (character == 'A' || character == 'E' || character == 'I' || character == 'O'
                || character == 'U')
    {
        vowelCount ++;

    }
}
outFile << "number of vowels: " << vowelCount << endl;

I am trying to input a sentence, read how many vowels, blank spaces, and other characters it has. But the vowelCount is never right and I can't get it to write the same sentence to output file either. Any hints?

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4  
You are already reading into character. Why read again in ch? Also, you might want to read up what a vowel is and how many there are. –  pmr Feb 8 '12 at 0:36
1  
worse, yet, reading into character just skipped leading spaces as well! You only want to use something like cin.get(ch). The other issue is that the argument to toupper() has to be a positive integer but char can be signed in which case e.g. my name could crash your program. You want to use something like toupper(static_cast<unsigned char>(ch)). –  Dietmar Kühl Feb 8 '12 at 0:46
    
Using cin >> character operator reads in one character off the standard input into the character variable. Doing cin.get(ch) reads in a second character into the ch variable. You only need to do one of these operations. Delete the cin.get(ch) line and try replacing all references to character with ch. –  mmodahl Feb 8 '12 at 0:46
    
when I write to outFile, how can i write say (character) with white spaces as well. –  user1193717 Feb 8 '12 at 1:02
    
@mmodahl: your characterization of the behavior of cin >> character is only correct if the noskipws flag is set (e.g. using std::cin >> std::noskipws). Otherwise formatted input of a character skips leading whitespace. This should also answer the question on how to also write whitespace. –  Dietmar Kühl Feb 8 '12 at 1:18

2 Answers 2

You have not shown the declaration / initialization of the variable vowelCount. I assume you have only declared (and not initialized) it using a statement like:

int vowelCount; // notice the variable is not initialized.

In C++, int variables have no default value. If you have written such code, you can correct it by explicitly initializing its value with a statement like:

int vowelCount = 0;

Moreover, your loops reads 2 characters at each iteration (skipping one out of two characters) and you are missing the vowel Y.

The corrected example would look like:

//Get data from user 
cout << "Enter your sentence on one line followed by a # to end it: " << endl;

int vowelCount = 0;
while (cin >> character && character != '#') 
{
    character = toupper(character);

    if (character == 'A' || character == 'E' || character == 'I' || character == 'O'
                || character == 'U' || character == 'Y')
    {
        vowelCount ++;

    }
}
outFile << "number of vowels: " << vowelCount << endl;
share|improve this answer
    
This is slightly misleading considering his next task is to count whitespaces. –  Mooing Duck Feb 8 '12 at 0:59
    
OP can use disable/enable the skipping of whitespace using the cin >> noskipws and cin >> skipws manipulators or can use the while (cin.get(character)) syntax instead. –  André Caron Feb 8 '12 at 1:12
    
From Wiki: In writing systems based on the Latin alphabet, the letters A, E, I, O, U, and sometimes Y are all used to represent vowels. 'Y' might be optional for his homework. –  Angel Koh Feb 8 '12 at 3:09

Just like pmr's comment indicates, the problem is that you are reading in two characters with each loop iteration, but only checking the first one. Both of these statements consume a character from stdin:

cin >> character
...
cin.get(ch)

all you need to do is this:

while (cin >> character && character != '#') 
{
    character = static_cast<char>(toupper(character));
share|improve this answer
    
how would I read white spaces? once I got the vowels, I am stuck on reading white spaces. –  user1193717 Feb 8 '12 at 0:58
    
cin >> character can in fact consume many characters. –  Mooing Duck Feb 8 '12 at 0:59

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