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Say I have the following bean:

<bean id="some-bean" class="com.icyrock.example.SomeBean">
  <property name="pa1" value="va1"/>
  <property name="pa2" value="va2"/>
  <property name="pa3" value="va3"/>
  <property name="pa4" value="va4"/>
  <property name="pa5" value="va5"/>
  <property name="pa5">
    <bean class="com.icyrock.example.SomeOtherBean>
      <property name="px1" value="vx1"/>
      <property name="px2" value="vx2"/>
      <property name="px3" value="vx3"/>
      <property name="px4" value="vx4"/>
      <property name="px5" value="vx5"/>
    </bean>
  </property>
</bean>

I'd like to separate this into blocks along the lines:

<block id="b1">
  <property name="pa1" value="va1"/>
  <property name="pa2" value="va2"/>
  <property name="pa3" value="va3"/>
</block>

<block id="b2">
  <property name="pa4" value="va4"/>
  <property name="pa5" value="va5"/>
</block>

<block id="b3">
  <property name="px1" value="vx1"/>
  <property name="px2" value="vx2"/>
</block>

<block id="b4">
  <property name="px3" value="vx3"/>
  <property name="px4" value="vx4"/>
  <property name="px5" value="vx5"/>
</block>

<bean id="some-bean" class="com.icyrock.example.SomeBean">
  <block-ref id="b1"/>
  <block-ref id="b2"/>
  <property name="pa5">
    <bean class="com.icyrock.example.SomeOtherBean>
      <block-ref id="b3"/>
      <block-ref id="b4"/>
    </bean>
  </property>
</bean>

where block and block-ref are imaginary Spring tags just to illustrate the idea.

Is there a way to do this without:

  • Changing the Java classes (e.g. to accept the map of properties or a subclass)
  • Using anything not already in Spring itself (i.e. anything along the lines of building some factories/property-setters/whatever else to use in Spring context file(s) or so)

The purpose would be to reuse definitions (i.e. blocks) without making any relationships (e.g. parent-child relationships or things like that). As an example, this is standard JDBC data-source definition:

<bean id="dataSource" destroy-method="close" class="org.apache.commons.dbcp.BasicDataSource">
    <property name="driverClassName" value="${jdbc.driverClassName}"/>
    <property name="url" value="${jdbc.url}"/>
    <property name="username" value="${jdbc.username}"/>
    <property name="password" value="${jdbc.password}"/>
</bean>

(example from here). If there are different servers that are accessed, it can be the case that they share the same driver (so driverClassName would be the shared) and it also can be the case they use the same credentials (so username and password would be the shared). I'd like to do something like:

<block id="driver-credentials">
    <property name="driverClassName" value="${jdbc.driverClassName}"/>
    <property name="username" value="${jdbc.username}"/>
    <property name="password" value="${jdbc.password}"/>
</block>

<bean id="ds1" class="org.apache.commons.dbcp.BasicDataSource">
    <property name="url" value="${jdbc.url1}"/>
    <block-ref id="driver-credentials"/>
</bean>

<bean id="ds2" class="org.apache.commons.dbcp.BasicDataSource">
    <property name="url" value="${jdbc.url2}"/>
    <block-ref id="driver-credentials"/>
</bean>

<bean id="ds3" class="org.apache.commons.dbcp.BasicDataSource">
    <property name="url" value="${jdbc.url3}"/>
    <block-ref id="driver-credentials"/>
</bean>

or something along these lines. Obviously this can be a parent-child for this simple example, I'm just wondering about a mixin-type solution. Pretty much the same thing Spring offers for multiple files, except on the bean level.

Opinions on why doing the above would not be good or alternative ways to do it are welcome.

share|improve this question

Parent child with merge = true on child is the one supported by spring. merge does act as mixin (in a way for collections), right?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, but I'm trying not to have parent-child relationship and my properties are not collections, it's just a set of properties, each of which can be anything really (e.g. a String as above). – icyrock.com Feb 8 '12 at 23:42

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