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I am working on splitting a source file into tokens, particularly scanning for identifiers. However, there is a requirement that identifiers be AT MOST 30 characters long. When an identifier reaches this length, I raise an exception with the message: 'Identifiers can only be 30 characters long, truncating..'.

This is how it should be, but when I raise this exception I jump out my method that scans for identifiers before I am able to store it. I need to somehow raise the exception AND keep the identifier that I have collected so far. Any ideas as to how this could be done?

# classify each character, and call approriate scan methods
def tokenize()
  @infile.each_char do |c|
    begin
      case c
      when /[a-zA-Z\$]/
        scan_identifier(c)
      when /\s/ 
        #ignore spaces
      else
        #do nothing
      end
    rescue TokenizerError => te
      puts "#{te.class}: #{te.message}"
    end
  end
end

# Reads an identifier from the source program
def scan_identifier(id)
  this_id = id #initialize this identifier with the character read above

  @infile.each_char do |c|
    if c =~ /[a-zA-Z0-9_]/
      this_id += c 
      # raising this exception leaves this function before collecting the 
      # truncated identifier
      raise TokenizerError, 'Identifiers can only be 30 characters long, truncating..' if this_id.length == 30
    else 
      puts "#{this_id}"
      break # not part of the identifier, or an error
    end
  end
end
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1  
Exceptions should be used only in "exceptional" cases. Do not try to create program flow out with them. Simply return the token from your method. –  Francisco Soto Feb 8 '12 at 5:10
    
It wasn't intended to be a program flow issue. I am required to raise a warning to whoever is using the program that their identifier is too long, and it is being truncated. I figured that an exception would be the logical way to do that. What would be a good alternative? –  Hunter McMillen Feb 8 '12 at 5:11
    
Let me turn this into an answer. –  Francisco Soto Feb 8 '12 at 5:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is an abuse of exceptions, IMO, because this is not an exceptional case. Instead, consider simply logging something:

    if c =~ /[a-zA-Z0-9_]/
      warn "Identifer was too long and was truncated"
      this_id += c 

If you must use the exception for some reason, then the most straightforward way is just to put this_id in an instance variable instead:

@this_identifier = id
# ...

Then, when you break in the rescue, just have the last expression be @this_identifier to return that value (yuck).


Bonus comment: this is a truly wretched way to parse source files. You should be using something like RubyParser if you're parsing Ruby, or Treetop if you're parsing something else.

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Unfortunately this is for a project I am building a compiler from the ground up. If I had a choice I would be using lex and yacc to avoid this part of the compilation. Also, what is so bad about this approach? (besides the exception abuse) –  Hunter McMillen Feb 8 '12 at 5:19
    
For starters, your tokenizer can be much shorter, since its only effect is to parse out identifiers and ignore everything else. Just split on words and warn on each one that exceeds 30 characters: good, bad = @infile.read.split.partition { |word| word.length < 30 }. –  John Feminella Feb 8 '12 at 5:21
    
I abstracted the rest of the tokenizer, it actually tokenizes the complete input language properly. With the exception of the case I posted about. The source files I parse can contain anything that could be in a PL/0 program. –  Hunter McMillen Feb 8 '12 at 5:24
1  
@HunterMcMillen: Alrighty. I still think Treetop is a better, since it's a much nicer and higher-level approach to lexing/parsing. –  John Feminella Feb 8 '12 at 5:27
    
I agree that TreeTop is better, but the assignment asks me to create it from scratch. –  Hunter McMillen Feb 8 '12 at 16:24

Exceptions should be used only in "exceptional" cases. Do not try to create program flow out with them. Simply return the token from your method.

Something along those lines:

 def tokenize()
    @infile.each_char do |c|
      begin
        case c
        when /[a-zA-Z\$]/
          scan_identifier(c)
        when /\s/ 
          #ignore spaces
        else
          #do nothing
        end
      end
    end
  end

  #Reads an identifier from the source program
  def scan_identifier(id)
    this_id = id #initialize this identifier with the character read above

    @infile.each_char do |c|
        if c =~ /[a-zA-Z0-9_]/
          this_id += c 
          if this_id.length == 30
            puts 'Identifiers can only be 30 characters long, truncating..'
            break
          end
        else 
          break #not part of the identifier, or an error
        end
    end
    puts "#{this_id}"
  end

When you need to warn your users about something they are doing is normal use case and generally expected, simply output a string to stdout or/and stderr in the case of a console application.

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