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I'm writing a quiz program. I have a 1-Dimensional array of correct answers from a text file, which I must compare to a users_guess to check if his guess is correct. I must spit out 6 random questions.

string questions[50];  // 50 questions
char answers[50]; // 50 correct answers
int i = 0;
char user_guess;

int rand_index = rand() % 10; //generate random number

for (i=0; i<6; i++)      //loop for 6 questions
{    
cout << questions[rand_index] << endl;
questions[rand_index] = answers[] // i need help. how do i compare the arrays?
cin >>  user_guess;
    if (user_guess != answers[]) // if he's wrong
    { 
    cout << "sorry. try again" << endl;
    cout << questions[rand_index] << endl;  // 2nd chance
    cin >> user_guess;
        if (user_guess!= answers[]) // wrong again
        {
        cout << "you lose.game over." << endl; //game over
        break;  // does this cancel the game all together?

        }
        else
        {
        cout << "good job!" << endl;
        i++;   // on to the next round
        }
    }
    else
    {
    cout << "good job!" << endl;
    i++;   // on to the next round
    }
}

my trouble is getting the array of questions hooked up with the array of answers. Also, ending the program if he's wrong twice. what do you all think?

share|improve this question
    
Ok, so you want to get 6 random questions from a pool of 50, present them one by one and if the user is wrong twice end the program, otherwise continue until he answer 6? –  whitelionV Feb 8 '12 at 6:17
1  
You should ask your teacher. That's what (s)he's there for. As for comparing arrays, you'll need to compare items one at a time; you can't compare whole arrays, unfortunately. –  Zenexer Feb 8 '12 at 6:17
    
ok well that helps. i can read some more into arrays to compare them one at a time. –  gamergirl22 Feb 8 '12 at 7:02
    
im actually doing this on my own. my older brother said this project really helped him get better at coding. he did it in college. im only 14 i wanna show him im good. –  gamergirl22 Feb 8 '12 at 7:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted
Here's a hint:

// ...
{
   const string &the_question = questions[rand_index];
   const char &the_answer = answers[rand_index]; // using a const char & 
                                                 // is a deliberate pedantism


   cout << the_question << endl;
   char user_guess;
   cin >> user_guess;
   if (the_answer != user_guess) { 
   ...
   }

Note: you increment once after good job, and again in the for loop, so you'll be counting by twos.

share|improve this answer
    
okay so declare 2 const .. passing the_question and the_answer allow me to use them as randoms ...i see what ur saying –  gamergirl22 Feb 8 '12 at 7:06
    
In the first version, you put the questions and the answers right into the program. Once you get all the bugs out of just printing the question and getting the answers, you move to the second version. In the second version, you have two files, one with fifty questions and the other with fifty answers. You load your arrays by reading the two files. When you get the bugs out of that, you go to the third version. That uses one file, with questions and answers alternating. You load your arrays by reading alternate lines. The last version, you can have any quantity of q & a in the file. –  Thomas L Holaday Feb 9 '12 at 6:02

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