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How do I split a string based on a delimiter in Bash?

I have this string stored in a variable:

IN="bla@some.com;john@home.com"

Now I would like to split the strings by ';' delimiter so that I have

ADDR1="bla@some.com"
ADDR2="john@home.com"

I don't necessarily need the ADDR1 and ADDR2 variables. If they are elements of an array that's even better.

Edit: After suggestions from the answers below, I ended up with the following which is what I was after:

#!/usr/bin/env bash

IN="bla@some.com;john@home.com"

arr=$(echo $IN | tr ";" "\n")

for x in $arr
do
    echo "> [$x]"
done

output:

> [bla@some.com]
> [john@home.com]

Edit2: There was a solution involving setting Internal_field_separator (IFS) to ';'. I am not sure what happened with that answer, how do you reset IFS back to default?

Edit3: RE: IFS solution, I tried this and it works, I keep the old IFS and then restore it:

IN="bla@some.com;john@home.com"

OIFS=$IFS
IFS=';'
arr2=$IN
for x in $arr2
do
    echo "> [$x]"
done

IFS=$OIFS

BTW, when I tried

arr2=($IN) 

I only got the first string when printing it in loop, without brackets around $IN it works.

share|improve this question
8  
arr2=($IN) creates a real array. So you should iterate over it with for i in "${arr2[@]}"; do ... ; done instead, when using the arr2=($IN) syntax :) That's why you only got the first string with the other method (like for i in $arr2; do ...; done). Note that you can print out items of an array too. Say you want to print the second item (mail addy), you would do echo "${arr2[1]}" . index "@" stands for "expand each item in the array to a separate word". –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 28 '09 at 3:22
5  
So "${arr2[@]}" with arr2 containing mails a@b.com and c@d.com, expands to "a@b.com" "c@d.com" :) Note that you can then also restore IFS already before the for-loop starts (when using this array method). now, since "for x in $arr2" only works because IFS is still ";" (the string is seen by "for" as separate words, since IFS split them at that time), currently you have to have IFS set to ";" throughout the whole loop, which may cause subtle problems when you don't think of it :) I found bash has some evil pitfalls. Maybe we should start making up a "bash pitfalls" question on SO? :) –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 28 '09 at 3:26
    
@JohannesSchaub-litb +1 for the "Bash pitfalls" question –  jmendeth Mar 16 '12 at 18:44
2  
With regards to your "Edit2": You can simply "unset IFS" and it will return to the default state. There's no need to save and restore it explicitly unless you have some reason to expect that it's already been set to a non-default value. Moreover, if you're doing this inside a function (and, if you aren't, why not?), you can set IFS as a local variable and it will return to its previous value once you exit the function. –  Brooks Moses May 1 '12 at 1:26
3  
@BrooksMoses: (a) +1 for using local IFS=... where possible; (b) -1 for unset IFS, this doesn't exactly reset IFS to its default value, though I believe an unset IFS behaves the same as the default value of IFS ($' \t\n'), however it seems bad practice to be assuming blindly that your code will never be invoked with IFS set to a custom value; (c) another idea is to invoke a subshell: (IFS=$custom; ...) when the subshell exits IFS will return to whatever it was originally. –  dubiousjim May 31 '12 at 5:21

22 Answers 22

up vote 279 down vote accepted

You can set the internal field separator (IFS) variable, and then let it parse into an array. When this happens in a command, then the assignment to IFS only takes place to that single command's environment (to read ). It then parses the input according to the IFS variable value into an array, which we can then iterate over.

IFS=';' read -ra ADDR <<< "$IN"
for i in "${ADDR[@]}"; do
    # process "$i"
done

It will parse one line of items separated by ;, pushing it into an array. Stuff for processing whole of $IN, each time one line of input separated by ;:

 while IFS=';' read -ra ADDR; do
      for i in "${ADDR[@]}"; do
          # process "$i"
      done
 done <<< "$IN"
share|improve this answer
4  
This is probably the best way. How long will IFS persist in it's current value, can it mess up my code by being set when it shouldn't be, and how can I reset it when I'm done with it? –  Chris Lutz May 28 '09 at 2:25
3  
now after the fix applied, only within the duration of the read command :) –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 28 '09 at 3:04
1  
I knew there was a way with arrays, just couldn't remember what it was. I like setting the IFS but am not sure with the redirect from $IN and go through read just to populate array. Isn't just restoring IFS easier? Anyway +1 fro IFS suggestion, thanks. –  stefanB May 28 '09 at 3:11
7  
You can read everything at once without using a while loop: read -r -d '' -a addr <<< "$in" # The -d '' is key here, it tells read not to stop at the first newline (which is the default -d) but to continue until EOF or a NULL byte (which only occur in binary data). –  lhunath May 28 '09 at 6:14
3  
@LucaBorrione Setting IFS on the same line as the read with no semicolon or other separator, as opposed to in a separate command, scopes it to that command -- so it's always "restored"; you don't need to do anything manually. –  Charles Duffy Jul 6 '13 at 14:39

Taken from Bash shell script split array:

IN="bla@some.com;john@home.com"
arrIN=(${IN//;/ })
share|improve this answer
16  
I just want to add: this is the simplest of all, you can access array elements with ${arrIN[1]} (starting from zeros of course) –  Oz123 Mar 21 '11 at 18:50
16  
Found it: the technique of modifying a variable within a ${} is known as 'parameter expansion'. –  KomodoDave Jan 5 '12 at 15:13
8  
If you want to split on a special character such as tilde (~) make sure to escape it: arrIN=(${IN//\~/ }) –  David Parks Dec 1 '12 at 4:21
6  
Does it work when the original string contains spaces? –  qbolec Feb 25 '13 at 9:12
4  
No, I don't think this works when there are also spaces present... it's converting the ',' to ' ' and then building a space-separated array. –  Ethan Apr 12 '13 at 22:47

If you don't mind processing them immediately, I like to do this:

for i in $(echo $IN | tr ";" "\n")
do
  # process
done

You could use this kind of loop to initialize an array, but there's probably an easier way to do it. Hope this helps, though.

share|improve this answer
8  
-1, you're obviously not aware of wordsplitting, because it's introducing two bugs in your code. one is when you don't quote $IN and the other is when you pretend a newline is the only delimiter used in wordsplitting. You are iterating over every WORD in IN, not every line, and DEFINATELY not every element delimited by a semicolon, though it may appear to have the side-effect of looking like it works. –  lhunath May 28 '09 at 6:12
36  
I would listen to you closer, Ihunath, and understand that you're right, if you weren't being as much of a jerk about it. While this is certainly not perfect (and I know that - I've seen wordsplitting before), if you know you're working with a list of semicolon-separated email addresses, good-enough is often better than technically correct. I upvoted the IFS answer (and even recommended that it be undeleted) because it's a better answer, but for the OP's problem this was good enough. There's a reason for the phrase "good enough." –  Chris Lutz May 28 '09 at 13:54
2  
You could change it to echo "$IN" | tr ';' '\n' | while read -r ADDY; do # process "$ADDY"; done to make him lucky, i think :) Note that this will fork, and you can't change outer variables from within the loop (that's why i used the <<< "$IN" syntax) then –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 28 '09 at 17:00
27  
@Chris: People being satisfied with "good enough" is the reason why 99.9% of all bash scripts in existance are a danger to anyone using them because of race conditions, bugs and security issues. "Good enough" is not good enough; and definitely not recommended (and any advice given is a recommendation to the one asking). –  lhunath May 28 '09 at 17:09
5  
I think that, while asking a new question, an OP try to insert a more specific part only to be clearer, while asking something more generic. You can see it crearly in this question: the OP started with the generic question How do I split a string based on a delimiter in Bash? and then he inserted his specific case to be clearer. After this question has been cast, people landing here want to know exactly how to split a generic string based on a delimiter and might not been fully satisfied in knowing how to solve the OP specific case. So lhunath is 100% correct imho –  Luca Borrione Sep 3 '12 at 10:46

How about this approach:

IN="bla@some.com;john@home.com" 
set -- "$IN" 
IFS=";"; declare -a Array=($*) 
echo "${Array[@]}" 
echo "${Array[0]}" 
echo "${Array[1]}" 

Source

share|improve this answer
    
+1, nice, I like that it does not use any external tools –  stefanB Jul 7 '09 at 4:22
2  
+1 ... but I wouldn't name the variable "Array" ... pet peev I guess. Good solution. –  Yzmir Ramirez Sep 5 '11 at 1:06
8  
+1 ... but the "set" and declare -a are unnecessary. You could as well have used just IFS";" && Array=($IN) –  ata Nov 3 '11 at 22:33
    
+1 Only a side note: shouldn't it be recommendable to keep the old IFS and then restore it? (as shown by stefanB in his edit3) people landing here (sometimes just copying and pasting a solution) might not think about this –  Luca Borrione Sep 3 '12 at 9:26
    
-1: First, @ata is right that most of the commands in this do nothing. Second, it uses word-splitting to form the array, and doesn't do anything to inhibit glob-expansion when doing so (so if you have glob characters in any of the array elements, those elements are replaced with matching filenames). –  Charles Duffy Jul 6 '13 at 14:44
echo "bla@some.com;john@home.com" | sed -e 's/;/\n/g'
bla@some.com
john@home.com
share|improve this answer
2  
-1 what if the string contains spaces? for example IN="this is first line; this is second line" arrIN=( $( echo "$IN" | sed -e 's/;/\n/g' ) ) will produce an array of 8 elements in this case (an element for each word space separated), rather than 2 (an element for each line semi colon separated) –  Luca Borrione Sep 3 '12 at 10:08
1  
@Luca No the sed script creates exactly two lines. What creates the multiple entries for you is when you put it into a bash array (which splits on white space by default) –  lothar Sep 3 '12 at 17:33
    
That's exactly the point: the OP needs to store entries into an array to loop over it, as you can see in his edits. I think your (good) answer missed to mention to use arrIN=( $( echo "$IN" | sed -e 's/;/\n/g' ) ) to achieve that, and to advice to change IFS to IFS=$'\n' for those who land here in the future and needs to split a string containing spaces. (and to restore it back afterwards). :) –  Luca Borrione Sep 4 '12 at 7:09
1  
@Luca Good point. However the array assignment was not in the initial question when I wrote up that answer. –  lothar Sep 4 '12 at 16:55

This also works:

IN="bla@some.com;john@home.com"
echo ADD1=`echo $IN | cut -d \; -f 1`
echo ADD2=`echo $IN | cut -d \; -f 2`

Be careful, this solution is not always correct. In case you pass "bla@some.com" only, it will assign it to both ADD1 and ADD2.

share|improve this answer

A different take on Darron's answer, this is how I do it:

IN="bla@some.com;john@home.com"
read ADDR1 ADDR2 <<<$(IFS=";"; echo $IN)
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't work. –  ColinM Sep 10 '11 at 0:31
    
I think it does! Run the commands above and then "echo $ADDR1 ... $ADDR2" and i get "bla@some.com ... john@home.com" output –  nickjb Oct 6 '11 at 15:33
1  
This worked REALLY well for me... I used it to itterate over an array of strings which contained comma separated DB,SERVER,PORT data to use mysqldump. –  Nick Oct 28 '11 at 14:36
5  
Diagnosis: the IFS=";" assignment exists only in the $(...; echo $IN) subshell; this is why some readers (including me) initially think it won't work. I assumed that all of $IN was getting slurped up by ADDR1. But nickjb is correct; it does work. The reason is that echo $IN command parses its arguments using the current value of $IFS, but then echoes them to stdout using a space delimiter, regardless of the setting of $IFS. So the net effect is as though one had called read ADDR1 ADDR2 <<< "bla@some.com john@home.com" (note the input is space-separated not ;-separated). –  dubiousjim May 31 '12 at 5:28
    
This work, but $() implie a fork. –  F. Hauri Jul 20 '13 at 13:47

Compatible answer

To this SO question, there is already a lot of different way to do this in . But bash as many special features, so called bashism that work well, but that won't work in any other . In particular, arrays, associative array, and pattern substitution are pure bashisms and may not work under other shells.

On my Debian GNU/Linux, there is a standard shell called , but I know many people who like to use .

Finally, in very small situation, there is a special tool called with his own shell interpreter ().

Requested string

The string sample in SO question is:

IN="bla@some.com;john@home.com"

As this could be usefull with whitespaces and as whitespaces could modify the result of the routine, I prefer to use this sample string:

 IN="bla@some.com;john@home.com;Full Name <fulnam@other.org>"

Split string based on delimiter in (version >=4.2)

Under pure bash, we may use arrays and IFS:

var="bla@some.com;john@home.com;Full Name <fulnam@other.org>"

oIFS="$IFS"
IFS=";"
declare -a fields=($var)
IFS="$oIFS"
unset oIFS

IFS=\; read -a fields <<<"$var"

Using this syntaxe under recent bash don't change $IFS for current session, but only for the current command:

set | grep ^IFS=
IFS=$' \t\n'

Now the string var is splitted and stored into an array (named fields):

set | grep ^fields=\\\|^var=
fields=([0]="bla@some.com" [1]="john@home.com" [2]="Full Name <fulnam@other.org>")
var='bla@some.com;john@home.com;Full Name <fulnam@other.org>'

This is the quickiest way to do this because there is no forks and no external ressource called.

From there, you could use the syntax you already know for processing each field;

for x in "${fields[@]}";do
    echo "> [$x]"
    done
> [bla@some.com]
> [john@home.com]
> [Full Name <fulnam@other.org>]

or drop each field after processing (I like this shifting approach):

while [ "$fields" ] ;do
    echo "> [$fields]"
    fields=("${fields[@]:1}")
    done
> [bla@some.com]
> [john@home.com]
> [Full Name <fulnam@other.org>]

or even for simple printout (shorter syntaxe):

printf "> [%s]\n" "${fields[@]}"
> [bla@some.com]
> [john@home.com]
> [Full Name <fulnam@other.org>]

Split string based on delimiter in

But if you would write something useable under many shells, you have to not use bashisms.

There is a syntax, used in many shells, for splitting a string accros first or last occurence of a substring:

${var#*SubStr}  # will drop begin of string upto first occur of `SubStr`
${var##*SubStr} # will drop begin of string upto last occur of `SubStr`
${var%SubStr*}  # will drop part of string from last occur of `SubStr` to the end
${var%%SubStr*} # will drop part of string from first occur of `SubStr` to the end

( The missing of this is the main reason of my answer publication ;)

This little sample script work well under , , , and was tested under Mac-OS's bash too:

var="bla@some.com;john@home.com;Full Name <fulnam@other.org>"
while [ "$var" ] ;do
    iter=${var%%;*}
    echo "> [$iter]"
    [ "$var" = "$iter" ] && \
        var='' || \
        var="${var#*;}"
  done
> [bla@some.com]
> [john@home.com]
> [Full Name <fulnam@other.org>]

Have fun!

share|improve this answer
5  
Hey thanks for showing me how to put SO tags inside posts! –  Steven Lu Aug 8 '13 at 20:00
    
awesome, quite nice the compatible option –  chilicuil Oct 15 '13 at 12:14

How about this one liner, if you're not using arrays:

IFS=';' read ADDR1 ADDR2 <<<$IN
share|improve this answer
    
Consider using read -r ... to ensure that, for example, the two characters "\t" in the input end up as the same two characters in your variables (instead of a single tab char). –  dubiousjim May 31 '12 at 5:36
    
-1 This is not working here (ubuntu 12.04). Adding echo "ADDR1 $ADDR1"\n echo "ADDR2 $ADDR2" to your snippet will output ADDR1 bla@some.com john@home.com\nADDR2 (\n is newline) –  Luca Borrione Sep 3 '12 at 10:07

I think 'awk' is the best and efficient command to resolve your problem, 'awk' is included in bash by default almost in every linux distro.

echo "bla@some.com;john@home.com" | awk -F';' '{print $1,$2}'

will give

bla@some.com john@home.com

Of course your can store each email address by redefining the awk print field.

share|improve this answer
1  
Or even simpler: echo "bla@some.com;john@home.com" | awk 'BEGIN{RS=";"} {print}' –  Jaro Jan 7 at 21:30
    
@Jaro This worked perfectly for me when I had a string with commas and needed to reformat it into lines. Thanks. –  Aquarelle May 6 at 21:58

This is the simplest way to do it.

spo='one;two;three'
OIFS=$IFS
IFS=';'
spo_array=($spo)
IFS=$OIFS
echo ${spo_array[*]}
share|improve this answer
    
That works what is not valid? Was it the typo? –  James Andino Feb 28 '12 at 8:19
    
A common typo, fixed it. I had thought you voted me down for it but I see you comment was from ages ago sorry. This does actually work though. I think it might be to simple though for bash scripters =) –  James Andino Feb 28 '12 at 8:54

You may also:

dirList=(
some
list
of
elements
)

for i in ${dirList[@]}; do
...
done
share|improve this answer
4  
-1 is this somehow related to the question? –  Luca Borrione Sep 3 '12 at 10:06

If no space, Why not this?

IN="bla@some.com;john@home.com"
arr=(`echo $IN | tr ';' ' '`)

echo ${arr[0]}
echo ${arr[1]}
share|improve this answer

Two bourne-ish alternatives where neither require bash arrays:

Case 1: Keep it nice and simple: Use a NewLine as the Record-Separator... eg.

IN="bla@some.com
john@home.com"

while read i; do
  # process "$i" ... eg.
    echo "[email:$i]"
done <<< "$IN"

Note: in this first case no sub-process is forked to assist with list manipulation.

Idea: Maybe it is worth using NL extensively internally, and only converting to a different RS when generating the final result externally.

Case 2: Using a ";" as a record separator... eg.

NL="
" IRS=";" ORS=";"

conv_IRS() {
  exec tr "$1" "$NL"
}

conv_ORS() {
  exec tr "$NL" "$1"
}

IN="bla@some.com;john@home.com"
IN="$(conv_IRS ";" <<< "$IN")"

while read i; do
  # process "$i" ... eg.
    echo -n "[email:$i]$ORS"
done <<< "$IN"

In both cases a sub-list can be composed within the loop is persistent after the loop has completed. This is useful when manipulating lists in memory, instead storing lists in files. {p.s. keep calm and carry on B-) }

share|improve this answer

One liner to split a string separated by ';' into an array:

IN="bla@some.com;john@home.com"
ADDRS=( $(IFS=";" echo "$IN") )
echo ${ADDRS[0]}
echo ${ADDRS[1]}

This only sets IFS in a subshell so you don't have to worry about saving and restoring it's value.

share|improve this answer
    
-1 this doesn't work here (ubuntu 12.04). it prints only the first echo with all $IN value in it, while the second is empty. you can see it if you put echo "0: "${ADDRS[0]}\n echo "1: "${ADDRS[1]} the output is`0: bla@some.com;john@home.com\n 1:` (\n is new line) –  Luca Borrione Sep 3 '12 at 10:04
1  
please refer to nickjb's answer at for a working alternative to this idea stackoverflow.com/a/6583589/1032370 –  Luca Borrione Sep 3 '12 at 10:05

There are some cool answers here (errator esp.), but for something analogous to split in other languages -- which is what I took the original question to mean -- I settled on this:

IN="bla@some.com;john@home.com"
declare -a a="(${IN/;/ })";

Now ${a[0]}, ${a[1]}, etc, are as you would expect. Use ${#a[*]} for number of terms. Or to iterate, of course:

for i in ${a[*]}; do echo $i; done

IMPORTANT NOTE:

This works in cases where there are no spaces to worry about, which solved my problem, but may not solve yours. Go with the $IFS solution(s) in that case.

share|improve this answer
    
Does not work when IN contains more than two e-mail addresses. Please refer to same idea (but fixed) at palindrom's answer –  olibre Oct 7 '13 at 13:33

Use the set built-in to load up the $@ array:

IN="bla@some.com;john@home.com"
IFS=';'; set $IN; IFS=$' \t\n'

Then, let the party begin:

echo $#
for a; do echo $a; done
ADDR1=$1 ADDR2=$2
share|improve this answer

In Bash, a bullet proof way, that will work even if your variable contains newlines:

IFS=';' read -d '' -ra array < <(printf '%s' "$in")

Look:

$ in=$'one;two three;*;there is\na newline\nin this field'
$ IFS=';' read -d '' -ra array < <(printf '%s' "$in")
$ declare -p array
declare -a array='([0]="one" [1]="two three" [2]="*" [3]="there is
a newline
in this field")'

This has the feature (either you want it or not) that if in is empty or unset, array will be empty:

$ in=
$ IFS=';' read -d '' -ra array < <(printf '%s' "$in")
$ declare -p array
declare -a array='()'

The trick for this to work is to use the -d option of read (delimiter) with an empty delimiter, so that read is forced to read everything it's fed. And we feed read with exactly the content of the variable in, with no trailing newline thanks to printf. Replacing

< <(printf '%s' "$in")

with

<<< "$in"

would add a trailing newline.

share|improve this answer
IN="bla@some.com;john@home.com"
set -- ${IN//;/ }
echo $1
echo $2

Output:

bla@some.com
john@home.com
share|improve this answer

I think that the cleanest way to "split a string" on "a delimiter" is to separate each action.
The splitting could be defined in a function, quite a simple one:

split(){ arr=($IN); }

And the splitting characters could be defined when the split function is called using a temporal IFS value. Being temporal does not change the internal IFS value.
One character ";" to split based on the "semicolon" of the line,
and the "new line" (return) $'\n' character to split several lines as well, as this:

IFS=";"$'\n' split

The whole script becomes, then:

#!/bin/bash

IN="bla@some.com;john@home.com;Full Name <fulnam@other.org>
albert@none.com;Charlie Brown <cbrown@acme.com>
alan@some.com;tony stark@home.com;* orwell@writers.com"

split(){ arr=($IN); }
IFS=';'$'\n' split

printf "> [%s]\n" "${arr[@]}"

This script does split either on "new line" or ";", more split characters could be added, or a different set could be defined.

Result:

> [bla@some.com]
> [john@home.com]
> [Full Name <fulnam@other.org>]
> [albert@none.com]
> [Charlie Brown <cbrown@acme.com>]
> [alan@some.com]
> [tony stark@home.com]
> [* orwell@writers.com]
share|improve this answer

echo "luke;yoda;leila" | tr ";" "\n"

Should work everywhere.

share|improve this answer

There are two simple methods:

cat "text1;text2;text3" | tr " " "\n"

and

cat "text1;text2;text3" | sed -e 's/ /\n/g'
share|improve this answer
2  
s/cat/echo/g charlimit –  Tom Dignan Jun 11 '12 at 16:28
2  
-1 Error: cat: text1;text2;text3: No such file or directory –  Luca Borrione Sep 3 '12 at 10:03
1  
I think you have cat and echo confused. cat reads from files. echo reads text given. –  DaboRoss Jun 29 '13 at 20:58

protected by Elenasys Dec 19 '13 at 21:39

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