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I have the following table

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[LogFiles_Warehouse](
    [id] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [timestamp] [datetime] NOT NULL,
    [clientNr] [int] NOT NULL,
    [server] [nvarchar](150) COLLATE Latin1_General_CI_AS NOT NULL,
    [storeNr] [int] NOT NULL,
    [account] [nvarchar](50) COLLATE Latin1_General_CI_AS NOT NULL,
    [software] [nvarchar](300) COLLATE Latin1_General_CI_AS NOT NULL,
 CONSTRAINT [PK_Astoria_LogFiles_Warehouse] PRIMARY KEY CLUSTERED 
(
    [id] ASC
)WITH (PAD_INDEX  = OFF, IGNORE_DUP_KEY = OFF) ON [PRIMARY]
) ON [PRIMARY]

And want to avoid having duplicate rows in my table. I thought about creating a UNIQUE index on the complete table, but then SQL Manager Studio tells me that this is not possible because the key would be too large.

Is there another way I could enforce unique rows over all columns, apart from indexes?

share|improve this question
    
You want unique row based on which columns? –  Thit Lwin Oo Feb 8 '12 at 8:17
2  
Surely having an identity means there will be no unique rows, are you talking about unique across the rest of the columns –  benni_mac_b Feb 8 '12 at 8:17
    
Could you tell us what is the interest of such a constraint? With fields such as timestamp and clientNr, I doubt that you can even get duplicate rows. –  Philippe Grondier Feb 8 '12 at 8:25
    
The data are logfiles that users can import. But when two users import the same logfiles, I want to avoid that the data is inserted twice. –  Florian Peschka Feb 8 '12 at 8:37

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Create a UNIQUE index on hashed values:

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[LogFiles_Warehouse]
        (
        [id] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
        [timestamp] [datetime] NOT NULL,
        [clientNr] [int] NOT NULL,
        [server] [nvarchar](150) COLLATE Latin1_General_CI_AS NOT NULL,
        [storeNr] [int] NOT NULL,
        [account] [nvarchar](50) COLLATE Latin1_General_CI_AS NOT NULL,
        [software] [nvarchar](300) COLLATE Latin1_General_CI_AS NOT NULL,
        serverHash AS CAST(HASHBYTES('MD4', server) AS BINARY(16)),
        accountHash AS CAST(HASHBYTES('MD4', account) AS BINARY(16)),
        softwareHash AS CAST(HASHBYTES('MD4', software) AS BINARY(16))
        )

CREATE UNIQUE INDEX
        UX_LogFilesWarehouse_Server_Account_Software
ON      LogFiles_Warehouse (serverHash, accountHash, softwareHash)
share|improve this answer
    
Would'nt it be easier to hash the complete row and create the index over that hash? –  Florian Peschka Feb 8 '12 at 10:34
    
@Florian: easier for who and how do you "hash the complete row"? An index on 3 16-byte fields is not a problem for the server. And if you are going to concatenate all values then it's a possible source for confusion between, say, server=MSSQLServer,account=20081 and server=MSSQLServer2008,account=1. –  Quassnoi Feb 8 '12 at 11:35
    
Okay, that makes sense. Can I add the other rows to the index, too? (i.e. timestamp, clientnr and storenr) So the index will effectively be over all columns in the end? Without the IDENTITY of course. –  Florian Peschka Feb 8 '12 at 11:37
    
@Florian: of course. If they're not varchars (like INT or DATE) you can just add them directly rather than hashed. –  Quassnoi Feb 8 '12 at 11:41

Use triggers + a smaller non unique index over the most distinguishing ields to helop aleviate the table s can problem.

This goes down a lot into a bad database design to start with. Fields like Software, Account do not belong into that table to start with (or if account, then not client nr). Your table is only so wisde because you arelady violate database design basics to start with.

Also, to abvoid non unique fields, you have NT to have the Id field in the unique testing otherwise you ont ever have doubles to start with.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is just a table to hold values from a logfile. None of the fields have functional, transitive, multivalued or any other dependencies to each other. Of course, that would mean that there can never be two identical rows - but, as the logfiles are imported, a user could import the same logfile twice and therefore create two identical rows. –  Florian Peschka Feb 8 '12 at 8:43

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