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Which one is better in terms of performance:

def check():
   if (statement1 and
       statement2 and
       statement3):
     return True
   else: 
     return False

def doIt():
   if check():
     perform()

vs

def doIt():
   if (statement1 and
       statement2 and
       statement3):
      perform()
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Why don't you measure yourself? –  Tadeusz A. Kadłubowski Feb 8 '12 at 8:44
1  
@TadeuszA.Kadłubowski Maybe he doesn't know how to? Your comment is certainly not helpful. –  Hasan Khan Feb 8 '12 at 8:46
    
you could do your check function like this: def check(): return stat1 and stat2 and stat3 –  shenshei Feb 8 '12 at 8:51
    
Yes, I don't know how to measure it. Would you please show me how? –  alwbtc Feb 8 '12 at 9:10
    
@shenshei why do you think that is better? –  alwbtc Feb 8 '12 at 9:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If (and only if) you're having performance issues, time it yourself:

% python -m timeit -c '
statement1 = True
statement2 = True
statement3 = True

def perform():
    pass

def check():
    if (statement1 and
        statement2 and
        statement3):
        return True
    else:
        return False

def doIt():
    if check():
        perform()

doIt()
'
1000000 loops, best of 3: 1.37 usec per loop

If you're not having performance issues, follow The Zen of Python and remember what Donald Knuth said about premature optimisation.

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how do I add "timeit" to my program and when my program ends it displays the run time in the end on screen? –  alwbtc Feb 8 '12 at 9:14
    
Please see the linked documentation for details. You're better off just testing a small snippet. –  Johnsyweb Feb 8 '12 at 9:18

Don't bother. The former is more readable, use that and if your app suffers from performance issues, profile the code. If you identify this as the problem, you can inline the function call.

Generally speaking though, function calls are expensive in Python so if the invocation to check is going to be run a VERY large number of times in a loop, it can affect the performance. Even so, inlining it at the outset is probably not a good idea.

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Just from my basic software knowledge, I think the function call would cost extra effort then coding directly in side block.

Usually, the function call have to record the current coding pointer for later return from function call.

Function should make your code more readable and reusable function is easy for debugging and maintaining.

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