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For example, I have a table name test_table and has a column named column_A which has values:

A_1
A_2
A_3
A1
A2
A3
B_1
B_2
B_3
B1
B2
B3

If i want to select all the data has A_ as the beginning, i can use escape \ like:

select * from test_table where column_A like 'A\_*' escape '\';

so that _ not treated as a single character wildcard. i can get A_1, A_2 and A_3.

How should i do when i want use this in Between and operator? like

select * from test_table where column_A between 'A_\*' and 'B_\*' 

i tried the above one, it didn't escape the _. if i add a escape right after condition like

select * from test_table 
 where column_A between 'A_\*' escape '\' and 'B_\*' escape '\'

or

select * from test_table 
 where column_A between 'A_\*' and 'B_\*' escape '\'

i got a syntax error.

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1  
It doesn't really make sense to escape characters with the comparison operators because these operators don't treat ANY character as special. There are no wildcards characters with BETWEEN, therefore no need to escape them. What do you expect your query to return, it is really not clear. –  Vincent Malgrat Feb 8 '12 at 9:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

BETWEEN doesn't seem to permit escaping of wildcards using that syntax; I assume you're getting ORA-00933: SQL command not properly ended? (Always useful to actually state the error you're seeing). It does though allow the alternative syntax:

select * from test_table
where column_A between 'A[_]%' and 'B[_]%';

Edit Actually although the syntax is allowed, it isn't doing anything; BETWEEN isn't treating _ as a wildcard anyway, though it does treat % as one.

Edit 2 As @Allan pointed out, it really isn't treating % as a wildcard, that's just how the character ordering works.

I'm not sure that's what you actually want though, as it will give you A_1, A_2, A_3, B1, B2, B3 (at least with my NLS parameters).

If what you actually want is A_1, A_2, A_3, B_1, B_2, B_3 then you can use REGEXP_LIKE instead, something like:

select * from test_table
where regexp_like(column_A, '^([AB])_';

(though I'll happily defer to others on the best way to construct that).

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1  
I don't think between is actually treating % as a wildcard. I believe it's returning those results because numeric values fall after the percent sign in the character table. That also explains why the "B_1", etc. values are not returned. –  Allan Feb 9 '12 at 17:04
    
@Allan - yes, of course it is. D'oh. I was thinking it must be treating it as a wildcard because it still found records, but you're right, that's just because % has a lower ASCII (or unicode) value than alphanumerics. Thanks for pointing that out. –  Alex Poole Feb 9 '12 at 17:18

You can't escape characters with the comparison operators because there are no wildcards with these operators. I don't think BETWEEN is the right operator for the task.

You seem to want all strings that start with a letter between A and B and are followed by a _. I would advise you to take a look at regexp_like, which is more flexible than the LIKE operator. For example you could write:

SQL> WITH test_table AS (
  2     SELECT 'A_1' column_A FROM dual
  3     UNION ALL SELECT 'A_2' FROM dual
  4     UNION ALL SELECT 'A_3' FROM dual
  5     UNION ALL SELECT 'A1' FROM dual
  6     UNION ALL SELECT 'A2' FROM dual
  7     UNION ALL SELECT 'A3' FROM dual
  8     UNION ALL SELECT 'B_1' FROM dual
  9     UNION ALL SELECT 'B_2' FROM dual
 10     UNION ALL SELECT 'B_3' FROM dual
 11     UNION ALL SELECT 'B1' FROM dual
 12     UNION ALL SELECT 'B2' FROM dual
 13     UNION ALL SELECT 'B3' FROM dual
 14  )
 15  SELECT * FROM test_table
 16   WHERE regexp_like (column_A, '^[A-B]_.*');

COLUMN_A
--------
A_1
A_2
A_3
B_1
B_2
B_3
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