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I have a contour plot, I am wondering is it possible to label the individual contour levels as well as the colours? (i.e. say the first pink contour is 0.2, second is 0.4 or whatever works).

Also, what is the argument for filling land as a solid color?

library(lattice)
contourplot(cor_Warra_SF_SST_SON, region=TRUE, at=seq(-1, 1, 0.2), 
labels=FALSE, row.values=lon_sst, column.values=lat_sst,
xlab='longitude', ylab='latitude')

enter image description here

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

To include labels for the contour lines, simply set labels = TRUE (in place of the labels=FALSE that you are currently using).

?contourplot document the labels argument thusly:

labels: typically a logical indicating whether contour lines should be labelled, but other possibilities for more sophisticated control exists. Details are documented in the help page for ‘panel.levelplot’, to which this argument is passed on unchanged. That help page also documents the ‘label.style’ argument, which affects how the labels are rendered.

To add filled polygons for the continents, I'd try using mapplot() from the latticeExtra package, adding it to the plot you're already produced using layer(), also from latticeExtra. (I can't get much more specific than that without having access to the data you are using.)

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Thanks, is it possible to specify label region like (-1,-0.5) and (0.5,1)? – Yu Deng Feb 8 '12 at 9:42
1  
Have a look at the at= argument, documented in both ?contourplot and ?panel.contourplot. I'd try something like at =c(-1, -.5, 0, .5, 1) (Also don't be concerned that at= appears to be an argument to just levelplot(), rather than contourplot(): in fact, the same panel function is used for both, and they differ only in their default values.) Good luck! – Josh O'Brien Feb 8 '12 at 9:52

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