Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a way to execute a Groovy class by specifying the package with dots, as with java?

Example: File ./my/package/MyClass.groovy:

package my.package

class MyClass {
  static void main(String[] args) {
    println "ok"
  }
}
> cd my/package
my/package> groovy MyClass
ok
> cd ../..
> groovy my/package/MyClass.groovy
ok
> groovy my/package/MyClass
ok
> groovy my.package.MyClass
Caught: java.io.FileNotFoundException: my.package.MyClass

I was expecting the last command to work. I tried various ways of setting the classpath, to no avail.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 11 down vote accepted

First of all, package is a reserved keyword, so you can't use it as a a package name.

Second of all, you can't do that in Groovy, since the dot notation is used for classes, not for scripts, so you need a compiled class file to use it.

Still, you can replace the groovy command with java + classpath:

java -cp /usr/share/java/groovy/embeddable/groovy-all-1.6.3.jar:. my.some.MyClass

You can add an alias to it 'g_java' for instance to make it less verbose.

share|improve this answer
    
It sounds like the right answer, but it isn't working. I used "my.package" as an example, by the way- a bad one I realize. Anyway, even with an acceptable package name, and after compilation with groovyc, it doesn't work. groovyc my/some/MyClass.groovy export CLASSPATH=. ls my/some/MyClass.class my/some/MyClass.class groovy my.some.MyClass Caught: java.io.FileNotFoundException: /Users/olivier/my.some.MyClass (/Users/olivier/my.some.MyClass) ? –  Olivier Gourment May 28 '09 at 16:51
    
You're right, I don't know how I missed that. If you don't mind cheating a bit, you can replace the groovy command with java + classpath: java -cp /usr/share/java/groovy/embeddable/groovy-all-1.6.3.jar:. my.some.MyClass You can add an alias to it 'g_java' for instance to make it less verbose. –  Robert Munteanu Jun 1 '09 at 7:44
    
Thanks. It works. So, the answer to my original question is: No, it doesn't work this way in Groovy. You have to use javac and java. –  Olivier Gourment Jun 1 '09 at 16:21
1  
Updated the question to reflect the correct answer. –  Robert Munteanu Jun 1 '09 at 19:17
    
Thanks, I was looking for this answer. +1. Is there an extra period at the end of your java... line? –  Yar Dec 26 '09 at 0:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.