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As I understand it, to have a single resolve call all entities must be "linked together" through their dependencies. When resolving the root entity the DI container will recursively create the rest. In the samples I have seen for Prism the Shell window has no explicit depencies so when it is resolved in the CreateShell of the bootstrapper it all stops there. Because of this modules must be explicitly resolved in the InitializeModules method.

Likewise, inserting views into the shell is usually done by resolving them in the module Initialize method and explicitly setting them to a given region, thus using the DI container more as a service locator.

Does anybody know how to link things together to enable a single resolve in Prism?

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because in the bootstrapper you link your modules and add them to you modulecatalog, the shell will create a new instance of that module. Thus You can create a constructor in the Module Class and add a Interface parameter refering to your DI Container. You then initialize all your views and stuff in the Initialize method of the Module class with the reference of your DI container you got from the constructor – Rik van den Berg Feb 8 '12 at 9:47
    
The way I see it distributing the registering of views, services etc. in modules is okay because it is done "in the same context" as the registerig of the core entities. For this you need the DI container. But keeping a reference to the DI container to be able to later on call resolve multiple times in the Initialize method is for me the service locator pattern. Ideally to avoid this the only resolve call you should find in the solution should be to the object graph root (Shell or something simular). – Pål Kristian Tønder Feb 8 '12 at 12:31

There is an application which has two modules Module1 and Module2.

You are saying the following is

public ShellView(IUnityContainer container, IRegionManager regionManager, IEventAggregator eventAggregator, IModule1 mod1, IModuel2 mod2)
{
}

better than this

public ShellView(IUnityContainer container, IRegionManager regionManager, IEventAggregator eventAggregator)
{
}

public class IModule1 : IModule
{
  public void Initialize()
  {
     var container = ServiceLocator.Current.GetInstance<IUnityContainer>();
     var regionManager = ServiceLocator.Current.GetInstance<IRegionManager>();
     regionManager.RegisterViewWithRegion("Region1", typeof(Module1View));   

  }
}

public class IModule2 : IModule
{
  public void Initialize()
  {
     var container = ServiceLocator.Current.GetInstance<IUnityContainer>();
    var regionManager = ServiceLocator.Current.GetInstance<IRegionManager>();
     regionManager.RegisterViewWithRegion("Region2", typeof(Module2View));   

  }
}

Which way one could do the project depends on many factors. For example I can selct the second approach citing

Modularity

The second approach is more loose coupled than the first. The first approach forces the app to declare the modules it is going to use.

I can decide my app will only define regions and I will create modules later on and inject the views to the respective regions.

I am not saying this is absolutely the case as you can very well select the first approach saying as the modules itself won't have any reference about where it is going to be used that approach is more modular. All I am saying is there are options about how to go about a problem and limiting the options is generally not a good idea.

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