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For some reason, exceptions thrown in an __autoload function aren't being caught when trying to call a static method on a class that doesn't exist yet (PHP 5.3.9).

See this sample code:

<?php
function __autoload($class)
{
    throw new Exception('loaded ' . $class . "\n");
}


try {
    echo "Object: ";
    $test = new Log();
}
catch (Exception $e)
{
    error_log($e->getMessage());
}

// Exception is caught with static var.
try {
    echo "Static var: ";
    Log::$blah;
}
catch (Exception $e)
{
    error_log($e->getMessage());
}

// Fatal error occures with static method.
try {
    echo "Static method: ";
    Log::blah();
}
catch (Exception $e)
{
    error_log($e->getMessage());
}

The exception is caught on the first 2 cases (new object and a static property of an unknown class), but is not caught on calling the static method.

share|improve this question
1  
What exactly is the log/debug output that you receive when the fatal error occurs? – Zenexer Feb 8 '12 at 9:47
1  
FWIW, it's the fact that you're throwing an exception in __autoload that's causing the problem, which frankly is not what PHP is expecting. Do you really need to do this? – Rob Agar Feb 8 '12 at 10:07
2  
I can smell a PHP bug here, don't you? I could reproduce it. It enters the autoload, but fails to throw the exception. Anyway, duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/8213488/… – Palantir Feb 8 '12 at 10:12
    
@RobAgar I don't agree. Of course the message of the exception is wrong, it should be: "FAILED to load $class". There is an example in the PHP manual which is structured in the very same way, just to demonstrate that you CAN throw exceptions in __autoload (example #3 php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.autoload.php). – Palantir Feb 8 '12 at 10:22
1  
@Palantir so it does. Feels wrong, but I guess it could be useful. But yeah, PHP bug. – Rob Agar Feb 8 '12 at 10:27
up vote 1 down vote accepted

PHP mixes errors and exceptions. In this case, the fatal error is "thrown" before the exception could be caught. It's about priorities. Calling an undefined function and giving the fatal error has a higher priority here than handling the exception, the code already stopped (Demo). Fatal errors itself can not be catched.

As you can not catch fatal errors with a try/catch block, your script stops at the fatal error.

Same would be for an undefined static property of a defined class. It would trigger a fatal error as well you won't be able to catch.

You can however turn errors into exceptions and catch those, however this does not work with fatal errors (Demo). I assume this is the root limitation you're running into: Fatal error brings script execution down, regardless if it appears inside a try/catch block or not. Exception handling is brought down as well.

Additionally, PHP 5.5.0-dev and PHP 5.4.0beta2-dev crashes with a simliar to yours code example. Which makes me believe that in the upcoming PHP version there will be a bug which could be considered a flaw. It might be worth to report this against PHP 5.4.

See also Exception slipping exception handler which illustrates your problem without the overhead of __autoload.

share|improve this answer
    
Great answer and references. – Palantir Feb 8 '12 at 13:42
    
If you remove the try/catch block from 'new Log();' or Log::$blah and comment the exception throwing in __autoload, you'll still get a Fatal error. So why only calling a static method of a undefined class has a higher priority for Fatal error than for exception handling? I guess this is indeed a bug in PHP? – bartzy Feb 8 '12 at 14:08
    
@bartzy: Sure, fatal errors are totally unrelated to exceptions. That's exactly the point. Probably I should have written that in bold upfront? – hakre Feb 8 '12 at 14:08
    
@hakre: I edited my last comment and added an explanation to what I meant. I think this is a PHP bug, not something regular that can be explained by the fact that this is a fatal error. The two examples above the static method example are generating fatal errors too. It's just that the exception is caught before that and stops the fatal error from happening. – bartzy Feb 8 '12 at 14:10
    
That can't hardly be a bug. You're doing different things here and those different things are done differently (as they are different things) by the scripting engine. In the first two (different) cases, before the fatal error is triggered (new Log; Log::$blah), the exception is triggered and prevent the fatal error to trigger. But with the function call, the fatal error is triggered regardless you throw the exception within autoload. The exception does not stop PHP to trigger the fatal error. With the first two examples no fatal error is actually created. – hakre Feb 8 '12 at 14:18

Yes, PHP have a problems with exceptions thrown in an __autoload. But you can use one interesting trick:

function __autoload($class)
{
    eval("class $class {            
        static function __callStatic(\$name,\$val){
            throw new Exception('Loaded ' . $class . PHP_EOL); 
        }         
    }");    
    throw new Exception('Loaded ' . $class . PHP_EOL);
}

And don't forgot to implement work with namespaces in evaled expression.

share|improve this answer
    
Just curious, how would that namespace look like in the eval'ed expression? – hakre Feb 8 '12 at 12:01
    
+1 for ingenuity – Rob Agar Feb 8 '12 at 12:13
    
Don't forget that this will only shift the fatal error up to the point where an undefined static property is accessed, namely Log::$blah; in the question. – hakre Feb 8 '12 at 12:38
1  
This seems like a really nasty hack for your autoload function. I just asked why is this happening :) – bartzy Feb 8 '12 at 14:39
    
Hakre, this will not shift fatal error up, this will prevent fatal error and shift normal exception up to the point where an undefined static property is accessed. But if you will try to create instances of this class somewhere in the code later (after autoloading failed), you need to implement __construct that will throw same exception in evaled expression. – Nayjest Feb 9 '12 at 10:55

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