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I'm removing our email system from our ASP.NET site which used to send emails immediately with a system to process requests in a separate service to reduce workload on the website. I'm trying to design it around a set of interfaces so that I can swap the implementations if I want, but initially it is going to be based around a message queue (MSMQ) to send requests to queue, have a service receive incoming requests and then process them. I currently have the following interfaces roughly defined:

// Sends one or more requests to be processed somehow
public interface IRequestSender
{
    void Send(IEnumerable<Request> requests);
}

// Listens for incoming requests and passes them to an observer to do the real work
public interface IRequestListener : IObservable<Request>
{
    void Start();
    void Stop();
}

// Processes a request given to it by a IRequestListener
public interface IRequestProcessor : IObserver<Request>
{
}

You'll notice that the Listener and Processor use the observable pattern since that is what I think seems to fit best.

My problem is figuring out how to write an implementation of IRequestListener that receives from an MSMQ, basically how do I create a suitable IObservable<T>?

My first option I found is to create an IObservable<T> from scratch based on the example given by the MSDN documentation, but that seems like a lot of plumbing work to do.

Another option is to use the Reactive Extensions as that seems to be designed to make it easier to create observables. The closest I've found to using Rx with MSMQ are these pages:

But I'm not sure how I can apply these examples to my IRequestListener interface.

Any other ideas are welcome too, even changes to my basic design if they are suitable.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I did initially use FromAsyncPattern, but then ended up writing a class for it because it dealt better with timeout and poisoned messages. Once started, Queues are anyway hot Observables. You can use also use Observable.Defer to make it closer to Rx instead of Start/Stop.

Here's a basic implementation of QueueObservable. You can just start by calling ListenReceive.

Subject<T> Subject = new Subject<T>();

protected void ListenReceive()
{
    Queue.BeginReceive(MessageQueue.InfiniteTimeout, null, OnReceive);
}

protected void OnReceive(IAsyncResult ar)
{
    Message message = null;

    try
    {
        message = Queue.EndReceive(ar);
    }
    catch (TimeoutException ex)
    {
        //retry?
    }

    if (message != null)
        Subject.OnNext((T) message.Body);

    Thread.Yield();

    if (!IsDisposed)
        ListenReceive();
}    

public IObservable<T> AsObservable()
{
        return Subject;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I was doing some experimenting along the same lines as this before seeing this answer, using a Subject<T> internally does help with keeping track of subscriptions and my implementation isn't a million miles away from your suggestions, thanks. –  Peter Monks Feb 10 '12 at 11:07
    
@PeterMonks No problem. –  Asti Feb 10 '12 at 13:12

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