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I am struggling to make this work:

public abstract class MapperFactory<M extends TaskMapper<? extends Message, ? extends Message, ? extends TaskForm>> {

    public static <M extends TaskMapper<? extends Message, ? extends Message, ? extends TaskForm>> MapperFactory<M> getMapperFactory(Message msgIn, Message msgOut) {

        if (msgIn.isMyMapper())
            return new MyTaskMapperFactory();

        throw new IllegalStateException("Mapper not found!");
    }

    public abstract TaskMapper<? extends Message, ? extends Message, ? extends TaskForm> getTaskMapper();

    public static class MyTaskMapperFactory extends MapperFactory<MyTaskMapper> {

        @Override
        public TaskMapper<? extends Message, ? extends Message, ? extends TaskForm> getTaskMapper() {
            return new MyTaskMapper();
        }

    }
}

public interface TaskMapper<I extends Message, O extends Message, F extends TaskForm> {

    public F fillForm(I msgIn, O msgOut, F taskForm);

    public O fillMsgOut(F taskForm);
}

public class MyTaskMapper implements TaskMapper<IncomingMessage, OutgoingMessage, MyTaskForm > {

    public MyTaskForm fillForm(IncomingMessage msgIn, OutgoingMessage msgOut,
            MyTaskForm taskForm) {
        return null;
    }

    public OutgoingMessage fillMsgOut(MyTaskForm taskForm) {
        return null;
    }

}

The problem is a compilation error:

Type mismatch: cannot convert from MapperFactory.MyTaskMapperFactory to MapperFactory

in my MapperFactory here:

if (msgIn.isMyMapper())
            return new MyTaskMapperFactory();

Any ideas how to fix this error?

Of course replacing:

public static <M extends TaskMapper<? extends Message, ? extends Message, ? extends TaskForm>> MapperFactory<M> getMapperFactory(Message msgIn, Message msgOut) {

        if (msgIn.isMyMapper())
            return new MyTaskMapperFactory();

        throw new IllegalStateException("Mapper not found!");
    }

with:

public static MapperFactory<?> getMapperFactory(Message msgIn, Message msgOut) {

        if (msgIn.isMyMapper())
            return new MyTaskMapperFactory();

        throw new IllegalStateException("Mapper not found!");
    }

would work, but that is not the answer that I am looking for.

This seems to be a problem with generic abstract factory pattern in general. Answers providing source samples using custom made-up objects are also welcomed.

share|improve this question
    
MAPPER is not a good class name following Java conventions. –  Hauke Ingmar Schmidt Feb 13 '12 at 11:52
    
Please make your class names as small as possible (but still clear). And rename MAPPER to Mapper? Weird/long class names just confuse/clutter up the question and the answers. –  Bohemian Feb 13 '12 at 12:01
    
@his MAPPER is not a class name. It is the name of generic Type such as T in HashMap<T> –  Wojtek O. Feb 13 '12 at 12:06
    
It is still a type name. All capital is for constants in Java. –  Hauke Ingmar Schmidt Feb 13 '12 at 12:08
    
@his - no it is not, nevermind... The convention is to use only single letters as BalusC stated here stackoverflow.com/questions/2900881/… so I changed my code to follow the conventions. –  Wojtek O. Feb 13 '12 at 12:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+100

According to Effective Java, 2nd edition, item 28:

If a type parameter appears only once in a method declaration, replace it with a wildcard.

Your getMapperFactory method only uses the type parameter M in the return type. Following this advice gives the following method signature, and the method compiles:

public static MapperFactory<? extends TaskMapper<Message, ? extends Message, ? extends String>> getMapperFactory(Message msgIn, Message msgOut)

EDIT: The more I look at the code, the more I think MapperFactory shouldn't be parameterized. The parameter isn't used in the code here, getTaskMapper returns a TaskMapper.

share|improve this answer
2  
Even shorter, the signature can just be public static MapperFactory<?> getMapperFactory(). The method doesn't constrain any of the type parameters more than the class signature for MapperFactory does. The same goes for public abstract TaskMapper<?, ?, ?> getTaskMapper(). (It could also be public abstract M getTaskMapper(), can't tell what the intent behind the type parameter is.) "When in doubt, use less generics" is probably a good rule of thumb. –  millimoose Feb 14 '12 at 15:39

The return statement works fine with a typecast:

return (BpmMapperFactory<MAPPER>)new Bpm007PrepareDocTaskMapperFactory();

That code will never execute though in its current form, because Bpm007PrepareDocTaskMapper doesn't extend BpmCommonMessageDto, so msgIn cannot possibly be an instance of Bpm007PrepareDocTaskMapper.

share|improve this answer
    
I edited the if part -thanks for info, that wasn't finished yet and it's not relevant here. Any way to avoid casts? –  Wojtek O. Feb 8 '12 at 14:36

My solution would be killing as much of the generics as possible with a fire:

abstract class MapperFactory<M extends TaskMapper<?, ?, ?>> {

    public static MapperFactory<?> getMapperFactory(Message msgIn, Message msgOut) {
        if (msgIn.isMyMapper()) return new MyTaskMapperFactory();
        throw new IllegalStateException("Mapper not found!");
    }

    public abstract M getTaskMapper();
}


class MyTaskMapperFactory extends MapperFactory<MyTaskMapper> {

    @Override
    public MyTaskMapper getTaskMapper() {
        return new MyTaskMapper();
    }

}


interface TaskMapper<I extends Message, O extends Message, F extends TaskForm> {

    public F fillForm(I msgIn, O msgOut, F taskForm); 

    public O fillMsgOut(F taskForm);

}

class MyTaskMapper implements TaskMapper<IncomingMessage, OutgoingMessage, MyTaskForm> {

    public MyTaskForm fillForm(IncomingMessage msgIn, OutgoingMessage msgOut, MyTaskForm taskForm) {
        return null;
    }

    public OutgoingMessage fillMsgOut(MyTaskForm taskForm) {
        return null;
    }

}

It's really not necessary to repeat the type parameters of a class in every method that uses it if you don't really care what they are or don't need to constrain them more than the class signature does.

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