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I tend put multiple lines of code that fullfill a certain task into blocks, with a small comment on top, like this:

public void doSomething(){
    // common variables needed by all blocks

    { // comment for block 1
        ...
        ... about 5 to 30 lines of code
        ...
    }

    { // comment for block 2
        ...
        ... about 5 to 30 lines of code
        ...
    }

}

I do this because in my opinion, it's easy to read, variables needed by one block won't be able to do harm in another block and because I don't want to make separate methods for block that won't be needed somewhere else.

Would you say this is bad practice? A lot of people I've coded with disagree with this style of coding. I know there are regions in c# but they do not isolate variables.

edit: because everyone is suggesting I make methods out of the blocks: Sometimes I do but I don't want to if the class already has 20+ methods, the blocks are not needed by any other method and the method with all the blocks is still small enough .

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2  
Aren't methods are invented exactly for doing this? –  Alex Nikolaenkov Feb 8 '12 at 10:33
    
cant you covert your blocks into methods? –  Blaze-Core Feb 8 '12 at 10:35

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I don't think this is bad practice, and I do it too, but I would encourage you to break the method into smaller ones. Do you really need a >50 lines method?

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If you can break the code up like that, why not just break it up into separate methods? Then change your doSomething() method into just calling those smaller methods?

That way:

  • It's clear what each element of the work is meant to do
  • Reading the top-level method, it's easy to see the overall plan and drill down to one specific part
  • You can potentially unit test each small method in isolation (although this may require making it non-private just for testing; whether that's okay or not is a personal preference as much as anything else)
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+1. Then you can forego the comments too, since the method name will describe what it's doing –  GazTheDestroyer Feb 8 '12 at 10:35
    
+1: I would only use multiple inner scope in test scripts where the use of cut-and-paste and less modularisation is fine IMHO. Even so, some people would break up the sections into separate tests. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 8 '12 at 10:40
    
Sometimes I do but I don't want to if the class already has 20+ methods, the blocks are not needed by any other method and the method with all the blocks is still small enough. –  Markus Feb 8 '12 at 10:42
2  
@Markus: If it's already got 20+ methods, perhaps the class itself is too large, with too many responsibilities? If it isn't too large, then I don't see that "having a lot of methods already" is a good excuse to not make this one method more readable. –  Jon Skeet Feb 8 '12 at 10:49
3  
@Markus: Having a bunch of well-targeted private helper methods in a class isn't a problem. Having massive methods that are difficult to understand and debug because they're over-long is a problem. –  T.J. Crowder Feb 8 '12 at 10:58

If your methods are so big that you feel you need to organize them like that, the odds are you should break them into smaller methods. (I speak from experience: I have a terrible habit of writing over-long methods, which are quite hard to maintain. I have to fight it every day.)

As for whether it's bad practice, I'd say it isn't per se, except that it's so unusual that it will tend to throw people doing maintenance on your code. They'll be looking for the thing at the beginning of the block — the if, or while, etc. — and be surprised when it's not there. So in that sense, it's probably not great practice, since tripping up people maintaining code is usually not a great idea.

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It depends what the blocks do. If they're used to restrict scoping of local variables to something sane, I think it's a good idea. People tend to give variables far too wide a scope and a clear end to the scope of a variable helps a lot when debugging or reviewing the code.

Having said that, if the code in a sections is longish, and the number of variables it shares with other sections is low, then maybe it is a good idea to refactor.

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That's fine. You should feel free to do that as isolating variables is a good practice. You can read these scoped blocks as sort of in-place anonymous functions, which is sometimes useful as a way of keeping code visually grouped together, though of course you each time you do this you should ask yourself "should I actually make this a separate function?", as suggested by the other posts here.

The other useful thing it can acheive, especially if you are using a code-aware editor that automatically formats blocks, is to indent important and specialist sections of code that otherwise wouldn't be indented. e.g.:

glBegin(GL_TRIANGLES); {
    glVertex3f( 0.0f, 1.0f, 0.0f);
    glVertex3f(-1.0f,-1.0f, 0.0f);
    glVertex3f( 1.0f,-1.0f, 0.0f);
}; glEnd();
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Your coding style is pretty unusual and I am not sure that everyone would find it very easy to read. Braces on their own make code less readable so you should be omitting them whenever possible. E.g. instead of

if(n == 1)
{
   i++;
}

just write:

if(n == 1)
   i++;

Scopes introduced just to separate different functional blocks within the same function don't sound right either - it would be much more natural to extract them into separate functions. One of the greatest benefits would be that you could test them much easier and test them separately. This would make doSomething() shorter, which is again in line with the good coding practice of keeping functions short.

Your comments written for scopes inside the function cannot appear in the automatically generated documents. If you use separate functions and apply those comments to them (assuming they are following the syntax of the given automatic document generation tool, like Doxygen) they will appear in documentation.

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As an opinion, I would have to disagree with your example. I find if and loops much more readable with braces, and definitively more maintainable. –  Jordan Sep 12 '13 at 22:04

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