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Today, while I was randomly reading the JavaScript patterns O'Reilly book, I found one interesting thing (page 27 for reference).

In Javascript, in some cases, there is a difference if the brace start location is different.

function test_function1() {
    return
    {
        name: 'rajat'
    };
}

var obj = test_function1();
alert(obj);  //Shows "undefined"

While

function test_function2() {
    return {
        name: 'rajat'
    };
}

var obj = test_function2();
alert(obj); //Shows object

JSfiddle Demo

Does any other language out there have such behavior? If so, then I would have to change my habit for sure..:)

I am mainly concerned about PHP, C, C++, Java, and ruby.

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1  
Reproduced in Chrome and IE9, good catch :P –  gideon Feb 8 '12 at 10:50
4  
White space sensitivity can be made to work---look at python or line mode fortran---but subtle white space sensitivity is the work of the devil. Gah! This is as bad as make! –  dmckee Feb 8 '12 at 20:18
    
This is impressive! Nice find! –  CheckRaise Feb 8 '12 at 20:56
    
Now I want to know why javascript behaves this way. –  CheckRaise Feb 8 '12 at 20:56
4  
@CheckRaise: I sum up the rules here: blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2004/02/02/… –  Eric Lippert Feb 8 '12 at 21:06
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6 Answers 6

up vote 50 down vote accepted

Any language that doesn’t rely on semicolons (but instead on newlines) to delimit statements potentially allows this. Consider Python:

>>> def foo():
...   return
...   { 1: 2 }
... 
>>> def bar():
...   return { 1: 2 }
... 
>>> foo()
>>> bar()
{1: 2}

You might be able to construct a similar case in Visual Basic but off the top of my head I can’t figure out how because VB is pretty restrictive in where values may be placed. But the following should work, unless the static analyser complains about unreachable code:

Try
    Throw New Exception()
Catch ex As Exception
    Throw ex.GetBaseException()
End Try

' versus

Try
    Throw New Exception()
Catch ex As Exception
    Throw
    ex.GetBaseException()
End Try

From the languages you mentioned, Ruby has the same property. PHP, C, C++ and Java do not simply because they discard newline as whitespace, and require semicolons to delimit statements.

Here’s the equivalent code from the Python example in Ruby:

>> def foo
>>   return { 1 => 2 }
>> end
=> nil
>> def bar
>>   return
>>   { 1 => 2 }
>> end
=> nil
>> foo
=> {1=>2}
>> bar
=> nil
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2  
Your VB example does't quite make the point because VB never allows a statement to span multiple lines unless you use the line-continuation sequence " _". –  phoog Feb 8 '12 at 21:58
2  
Ok I retract the previous comment because I just looked at the spec there are some contexts in which VB.NET supports implicit line continuations. I doubt any experienced VB programmer would consider this example a "gotcha", however, since it's pretty obvious that Throw and ex.GetBaseException() are separate logical lines. More specifically, since Basic historically uses lines to delimit its statements, a "gotcha" would more likely be a situation where a programmer thinks he's created a new statement on a new logical line, but hasn't. –  phoog Feb 8 '12 at 22:09
    
@phoog True, it’s absolutely not a gotcha. –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 8 '12 at 22:49
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The JavaScript interpreter automatically adds a ; at the end of each line if it doesn't find one (with some exceptions, not getting into them here :).

So basically the issue is not the braces' location (which here represent an object literal, not a code block as in most languages), but this little "feature" that forces your first example to return ; => undefined. You can check out the behavior of return in the ES5 spec.

For other languages that have similar behavior, check out Konrad's answer.

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4  
Highly upvoted answer, yet it’s actually wrong, sorry. The explanation is nice but please correct the mistake. –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 8 '12 at 16:03
    
The part about JavaScript is not wrong, the way it behaves like it does is because of the semicolon insertion which forces undefined to be returned. I wrote the bit about the other languages prefixed with afaik, so take it with a grain of salt :). –  Alex Ciminian Feb 8 '12 at 21:16
4  
But it's not true that JS inserts a semicolon "at the end of each line" "with some exceptions"; rather, it usually doesn't insert a semicolon, and there are only a few cases where it does. That's why it causes so many gotchas. –  ruakh Feb 9 '12 at 22:49
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The answer to that question is fairly easy. Any language that has "automatic semicolon insertion" might be in trouble on that line. The problem with this

return
{
     name: 'rajat'
};

..is that the js engine will insert a semicolon after the return; statement (and therefore, return undefined). This example is a good reason to open curly brackets always on the right side and never on the left side also. Since you already correctly noticed, if there is a curly bracket in the same line, the interpretator will notice that and can't insert a semicolon.

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Most certainly. Google's go programming language exhibits a very similar behavior (albeit with different effects). As explained there:

In fact, what happens is that the formal language uses semicolons, much as in C or Java, but they are inserted automatically at the end of every line that looks like the end of a statement. You don't need to type them yourself.

..snip...

This approach makes for clean-looking, semicolon-free code. The one surprise is that it's important to put the opening brace of a construct such as an if statement on the same line as the if; if you don't, there are situations that may not compile or may give the wrong result. The language forces the brace style to some extent.

Secretly, I think Rob Pike just wanted an excuse to require the One True Brace Style.

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10  
Cool, didn't know about this :). Personally, I don't think automatic semicolon insertion is a good idea. It can introduce subtle bugs that people inexperienced with the language will have a hard time figuring out. If you want to write semicolon free code, I prefer the python way. –  Alex Ciminian Feb 8 '12 at 12:29
    
@Alex Even languages without any semicolons (VB) have this property. And so does Python, which you apparently prefer, even though it handles this identically to JavaScript. –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 8 '12 at 16:05
    
I'd upvote, except that your second sentence is so completely wrong that it makes me want to downvote. I guess they cancel out. ;-) –  ruakh Feb 8 '12 at 16:12
1  
@ruakh do you mean "go does exactly this" or were you referring to the joke about rob pike? In the former case, I could reword to "go exhibits the same behavior", in the latter, I'm sorry if my lame sense of humor offends ;) –  Dave Feb 8 '12 at 16:20
1  
I mean the "Go does exactly this." The original proposal for Go's semicolon insertion explicitly contrasts itself with that of JavaScript, explaining, "This proposal may remind you of JavaScript's optional semicolon rule, which in effect adds semicolons to fix parse errors. The Go proposal is profoundly different", and that is quite true, on every level: it works differently, it has different effects, and it has almost no gotchas. (OTBS-enforcement, while annoying, isn't a gotcha, since it's a consistent requirement in all Go code.) –  ruakh Feb 8 '12 at 16:31
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FWIW, JSLint reports several warnings with that syntax:

$ jslint -stdin
function foo(){
  return
  { x: "y" };
}
^D
(3): lint warning: unexpected end of line; it is ambiguous whether these lines are part of the same statement
  return
........^

(3): lint warning: missing semicolon
  { x: "y" };
..^

(3): lint warning: unreachable code
  { x: "y" };
..^

(3): lint warning: meaningless block; curly braces have no impact
  { x: "y" };
..^

(3): lint warning: use of label
  { x: "y" };
.....^

(3): lint warning: missing semicolon
  { x: "y" };
...........^

(3): lint warning: empty statement or extra semicolon
  { x: "y" };
............^


0 error(s), 7 warning(s)
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The first language where I came across this was awk (which also has its share of syntax "oddities"; optional semi colons, string concatenation using only whitespace and so on...) I think the DTrace designers, which based the D syntax loosely on awk, had enough sense to NOT copy these features, but I can't remember off the top of my head. A simple example (counting the number of ENTITY tags in a DTD, from my Mac):

$ cat printEntities.awk 
# This prints all lines where the string ENTITY occurs
/ENTITY/ {
  print $0
}
$ awk -f printEntities.awk < /usr/share/texinfo/texinfo.dtd | wc -l
     119

If this little script instead were written with the brace on a line of its own, this is what would happen:

$ cat printAll.awk 
# Because of the brace placement, the print statement will be executed
# for all lines in the input file
# Lines containing the string ENTITY will be printed twice,
# because print is the default action, if no other action is specified
/ENTITY/
{ 
   print $0 
}
$ awk -f printAll.awk < /usr/share/texinfo/texinfo.dtd | wc -l
     603
$ /bin/cat < /usr/share/texinfo/texinfo.dtd | wc -l
     484
$ 
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