Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I got a list and a vector:

list<int> l;
for(int i=0; i<10; i++)
    l.push_back(i);

vector<int> v;

I want to initialize v using the first 5 elements in l, that is in this case {0,1,2,3,4}.

Besides for loop coupled with v.push_back, any other way? memcpy or copy?

PS: I am not using C++0x/C++11 at present.

share|improve this question
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit, er, anything wrong with my question? –  Alcott Feb 8 '12 at 11:11
    
Is boost allowed? –  hmjd Feb 8 '12 at 11:19
    
In C++11 there's std::copy_n (once you consider upgrading your compiler) –  jrok Feb 8 '12 at 11:23
    
@hmjd, sorry, I am not using boost either. –  Alcott Feb 8 '12 at 11:25
    
@jrok, yes, I am considering upgrade the compiler, but how? Install the newest g++? –  Alcott Feb 8 '12 at 11:25

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use std::copy and std::advance (instead of +, for the non-random-access iterator):

#include <list>
#include <vector>
#include <iterator>
#include <algorithm>

int main() {
   std::list<int> l;
   for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
       l.push_back(i);

   std::vector<int> v;
   v.reserve(5);

   std::list<int>::iterator start = l.begin(), end = start;
   std::advance(end, 5);
   std::copy(start, end, std::back_inserter(v));

   std::cout << v.size();   // 5
}

The advance is "slow", though, because of the nature of std::list<>; that's why op+ is not available for the std::list<>::iterator.

share|improve this answer
    
Using std::copy? Plz elaborate on that. –  Alcott Feb 8 '12 at 11:12
    
@Alcott: Done.. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 8 '12 at 11:18
    
thanks for the elaboration. –  Alcott Feb 8 '12 at 11:24
    
Why would you do that instead of a for loop? You essentially traversing your collection twice, advancing your iterator first in std::advance and then in std::copy. It's fine for 5, but when you would have ten million elements in your list, this would be a real waste of time. So formally the answer is correct, but why would you want to do that? for loop with vector::resize would work faster. –  mezhaka Feb 8 '12 at 11:43
    
@mezhaka: Indeed, you wouldn't want to do it. I did say it's slow, and a previous revision of my answer mentioned that it leads to double-traversal. A loop would be better; and you should use vector::reserve actually. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 8 '12 at 13:22

You can't avoid looping, this is the very nature of a list. There's certainly no guarantee as to how the data is stored so you can't use something like memcpy. If you don't want to access the elements of a container by looping through them, you shouldn't be using a list.

As other answers have pointed out there are a number of compact ways you can use iterators to do this, but all of them will ultimately loop through your list.

share|improve this answer
    
He's looking for a solution that loops for him. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 8 '12 at 11:11
    
That's not what the question says. –  naltmann Feb 8 '12 at 11:17
    
Well, yes, it basically is. He even wonders out loud whether std::copy can help. std::copy is a wrapper around a loop. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 8 '12 at 11:21
    
Oh yeah sorry, I take it back, I misread that. –  naltmann Feb 8 '12 at 11:29

This should do :

#include <list>
#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <algorithm>

struct convF
{
    convF( std::list<int>::const_iterator it_):it(it_){}

    int operator()()
    {
        return *it++;
    }

    std::list<int>::const_iterator it;
};

int main()
{
    std::list<int> l;
    std::vector<int> v;

    l.push_back(5);
    l.push_back(4);
    l.push_back(3);
    l.push_back(2);
    l.push_back(1);
    l.push_back(9);
    l.push_back(11);
    l.push_back(13);
    l.push_back(15);
    l.push_back(16);

    std::generate_n( std::back_inserter( v ), 5, convF(l.begin()) );

    std::copy( v.begin(), v.end(), std::ostream_iterator<int> (std::cout, " "));
    std::cout<<std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer

the most simple solution is:

list<int> l;
for(int i=0; i<10; i++)
    l.push_back(i);

vector<int> v(l.begin(), l.begin()+5);

This constructor takes two iterators marking the beginning and one element after the end.

share|improve this answer
    
No, you can't do arithmetic operation on list::iterator. –  Alcott Feb 8 '12 at 11:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.