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I am investigating a memory dump with WinDBG and I am wondering why the heap holds two System.Threading.ThreadAbortExceptions which are both empty.

For the other three found exceptions I understand why they are there and that they are created by default:

  1. System.ExecutionEngineException

  2. System.StackOverflowException

  3. System.OutOfMemoryException

WinDBG output

0:000> !dumpheap -type System.Threading.ThreadAbortException

Address       MT     Size
010210fc 79330ef8       72     
01021144 79330ef8       72     
total 2 objects

Statistics:
MT    Count    TotalSize Class Name
79330ef8        2          144 System.Threading.ThreadAbortException

Total 2 objects

0:000> !pe 010210fc

Exception object: 010210fc
Exception type: System.Threading.ThreadAbortException
Message: <none>
InnerException: <none>
StackTrace (generated):<none>
StackTraceString: <none>
HResult: 80131530

0:000> !pe 01021144

Exception object: 01021144
Exception type: System.Threading.ThreadAbortException
Message: <none>
InnerException: <none>
StackTrace (generated): <none>
StackTraceString: <none>
HResult: 80131530

So my questions would be:

  1. Are these two also created by default and - if so - why are there two?
  2. If not, why are they empty?

The memory dump is from a Windows Service.

Update with thread information from dump

0:000> !threads

ThreadCount: 14
UnstartedThread: 0
BackgroundThread: 8
PendingThread: 0
DeadThread: 4
Hosted Runtime: no
PreEmptive   GC Alloc           Lock

ID OSID ThreadOBJ    State     GC       Context       Domain   Count APT Exception
0    1 11d4 0015c538      a020 Enabled  00000000:00000000 00163aa0     0 MTA
2    2  71c 0016f6a0      b220 Enabled  00000000:00000000 00163aa0     0 MTA (Finalizer)
3    4 1914 0019ac48   180b220 Enabled  6a205b0c:6a207910 00163aa0     0 MTA (Threadpool Worker)
5    6 1bd4 001b1580   200b020 Enabled  00000000:00000000 00163aa0     0 MTA
6    7 16a4 001bd260   200b220 Enabled  6a1dc7b8:6a1dd910 00163aa0     0 MTA
7    8  870 001c4a58   200b220 Enabled  6a1da740:6a1db910 00163aa0     0 MTA
8    9 2204 001cf798      b220 Enabled  00000000:00000000 00163aa0     0 MTA
9    d  4d8 0021cb98    80a220 Enabled  00000000:00000000 00163aa0     0 MTA (Threadpool Completion Port)
10    e 1b70 002227c0   200b220 Enabled  6a27d820:6a27d910 00163aa0     0 MTA
11   89 2224 68a3fbd0   880b220 Enabled  00000000:00000000 00163aa0     0 MTA (Threadpool Completion Port)
XXXX   11    0 2336e658   8801820 Enabled  00000000:00000000 00163aa0     0 Ukn (Threadpool Completion Port)
XXXX   46    0 16d17270   8801820 Enabled  00000000:00000000 00163aa0     0 Ukn (Threadpool Completion Port)
XXXX   3a    0 16ca7a70   8801820 Enabled  00000000:00000000 00163aa0     0 Ukn (Threadpool Completion Port)
XXXX   3b    0 10e64250   8801820 Enabled  00000000:00000000 00163aa0     0 Ukn (Threadpool Completion Port)
share|improve this question
    
How many cores do you have? Could be there is one for each active thread. Create a few threads and look again. – Henk Holterman Feb 8 '12 at 11:48
    
@HenkHolterman thought about this as well. The virtual machine has 4 cores and !threads gives me a threadcount of 14. I updated the questions with the !treads info. – Martijn B Feb 8 '12 at 12:12
up vote 5 down vote accepted

They are pre-allocated by the CLR. I'll let these snippets from the SSCLI20 version of the CLR tell the story:

From clr/src/vm/clrex.cpp, CLRException::GetThrowable():

// If creating a normal ThreadAbortException fails, due to OOM or StackOverflow,
// use a pre-created one.
// We do not won't to change a ThreadAbortException into OOM or StackOverflow, because
// it will cause recursive call when escalation policy is on:
// Creating ThreadAbortException fails, we throw OOM.  Escalation leads to ThreadAbort.
// The cycle repeats.
throwable = GetPreallocatedThreadAbortException();

Same file, CLRException::GetPreallocatedRudeThreadAbortException() method:

// When we are hosted, we pre-create this exception.
// This function should be called only if the exception has been created.
_ASSERTE(g_pPreallocatedRudeThreadAbortException);
return ObjectFromHandle(g_pPreallocatedRudeThreadAbortException);

"The cycle repeats" could use some explanation: OutOfMemoryException -> Thread.Abort() -> new ThreadAbortException() -> OutOfMemoryException -> Thread.Abort(). Etcetera.

The same source file also has GetPreallocatedOutOfMemoryException(), GetPreallocatedStackOverflowException() and GetPreallocatedExecutionEngineException() for the exact same reasons.

share|improve this answer
    
Very helpful. Thanks! – Martijn B Feb 8 '12 at 13:10
1  
Okay, but why are there two of them? – svick Feb 8 '12 at 14:00
    
A thread abort can trigger a rude abort. – Hans Passant Feb 8 '12 at 14:14

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