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I got a method that checks if a string is a valid hex string:

public bool IsHex(string value)
{
  if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(value) || value.Length % 2 != 0)
    return false;

  return 
    value.Substring(0, 2) == "0x" &&
    value.Substring(2)
      .All(c => (c >= '0' && c <= '9') ||
                (c >= 'a' && c <= 'f') ||
                (c >= 'A' && c <= 'F'));
}

The rules are:
The expression must be composed of an even number of hexadecimal digits (0-9, A-F, a-f).
The characters 0x must be the first two characters in the expression.

I'm sure it can be rewriten in regex in a much cleaner and more efficient way.
Could you help me out with that?

share|improve this question
1  
I don't know about efficient, but it would certainly be a one liner. Don't assume that a Regex would be more efficient than your implementation. –  Oded Feb 8 '12 at 11:33
    
Your method doesn't check whether it contains a hex string, it checks whether it is a hex string and a hex string only. Subtle difference. Plus, it only allows hex values that have length of multiples of two. –  Abel Feb 8 '12 at 11:35
    
@Abel, you're right. Edited in original post. –  David Feb 8 '12 at 11:40
    
Your current code allows 0x as valid hex string. Is that intentional? –  CodesInChaos Feb 8 '12 at 11:53
    
@Oded: the current method of David goes through all characters always. A regular expression will only do that when necessary. If the first character is not a 0, it will immediately stop. Furthermore, a regex engine uses a direct lookup table where possible (meaning: current char not in lookup, then fail, this is faster than multiple ifs) and it jumps forward in as big a leap as possible. It is hard to beat a good regex. See Mastering Regular Expressions by Jeffery Friedl for how regex engines work in depth. –  Abel Feb 8 '12 at 11:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

After you updated your question, the new regex that works for you should be:

^0x(?:[0-9A-Fa-f]{2})+$

Where I use (?: for non-capturing grouping for efficiency. The {2} means that you want two of the previous expression (i.e., two hex chars), the + means you want one or more hex characters. Note that this disallows 0x as a valid value.

Efficiency

"Oded" mentioned something about efficiency. I don't know your requirements, so I consider this more an exercise for the mind than anything else. A regex will make leaps as long as the smallest matching regex. For instance, trying my own regex on 10,000 variable input strings of size 50-5000 characters, all correct, it runs in 1.1 seconds.

When I try the following regex:

^0x(?:[0-9A-Fa-f]{32})+(?:[0-9A-Fa-f]{2})+$

it runs about 40% faster, in 0.67 seconds. But be careful. Knowing your input is knowing how to write efficient regexes. For instance, if the regex fails, it will do a lot of back-tracking. If half of my input strings has the incorrect length, the running time explodes to approx 34 seconds, or 3000% (!), for the same input.

It becomes even trickier if most input strings are large. If 99% of your input is of valid length, all are > 4130 chars and only a few are not, writing

^0x(?:[0-9A-Fa-f]{4096})+^0x(?:[0-9A-Fa-f]{32})+(?:[0-9A-Fa-f]{2})+$

is efficient and boosts time even more. However, if many have incorrect length % 2 = 0, this is counter-efficient because of back-tracking.

Finally, if most your strings satisfy the even-number-rule, and only some or many strings contain a wrong character, the speed goes up: the more input that contains a wrong character, the better the performance. That is, because when it finds an invalid character it can immediately break out.

Conclusion: if your input is mixed small, large, wrong character, wrong count your fastest approach would be to use a combination of checking the length of the string (instantaneous in .NET) and use an efficient regex.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the non-capturing group! –  Heinzi Feb 8 '12 at 11:45

So, basically you want to check whether the number starts with 0x and continues with a (non-empty) sequence of 0-9 and/or A-F. That can be specified as a regular expression easily:

return RegEx.IsMatch(value, "^0x[0-9A-Fa-f]+$")

I'm not sure why you do the value.Length % 2 != 0 check... isn't "0x1" a valid hexadecimal number? In addition, my function returns false on "0x", whereas yours would return true. If you want to change that, replace + (= one or many) with * (= zero or many) in the regular expression.

EDIT: Now that you've justified your "even number" requirement, I suggest you use Abel's RegEx. If you do that, I suggest that you call your method IsMsSqlHex or something like this to document that it does not follow the "usual" hex rules.

share|improve this answer
    
It shoud follow the rules stated in the mssql convert to binary documentation. (added to original post) –  David Feb 8 '12 at 11:35
    
You probably want to add ^ and $, otherwise it doesn't behave equally to the code above. Perhaps you should even do ^0x([0-9A-Fa-f]{2})+$ –  Abel Feb 8 '12 at 11:37
    
@Abel: Thanks, I added ^ and $. I won't add the {2} for the time being, because that requirement doesn't really make sense to me. –  Heinzi Feb 8 '12 at 11:40
    
I would like to point out that this answer has very poor performance characteristics as you are not caching the work done involved with parsing the expression, or the compiled assembly created from the expression. It's best to create a static readonly Regex for regex expressions you know at compile time. –  Jonathan Dickinson Feb 8 '12 at 12:25
    
@JonathanDickinson: "very poor" might be an overstatement. Depending on input, I tried your suggestion and managed to get 5-15% gain overall. Not negligible, but not very much either. –  Abel Feb 8 '12 at 12:47

Diatribe: If you are at all concerned about speed forget about Regex. Regex is a NFA and is as such, in most cases, slower than a DFA or hand-written parser.

Ignoring that you asked for Regex here is something that would likely be more efficient (even though your implementation is probably fine - it does allocate strings):

static bool IsHex(string value)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(value) || value.Length < 3)
        return false;

    const byte State_Zero = 0;
    const byte State_X = 1;
    const byte State_Value = 2;

    var state = State_Zero;

    for (var i = 0; i < value.Length; i++)
    {
        switch (value[i])
        {
            case '0': 
                {
                    // Can be used in either Value or Zero.
                    switch (state)
                    {
                        case State_Zero: state = State_X; break;
                        case State_X: return false;
                        case State_Value: break;
                    }
                }
                break;
            case 'X': case 'x': 
                {
                    // Only valid in X.
                    switch (state)
                    {
                        case State_Zero: return false;
                        case State_X: state = State_Value; break;
                        case State_Value: return false;
                    }
                }
                break;
            case '1': case '2': case '3': case '4': case '5': case '6': case '7': case '8': case '9':
            case 'A': case 'B': case 'C': case 'D': case 'E': case 'F':
            case 'a': case 'b': case 'c': case 'd': case 'e': case 'f':
                {
                    // Only valid in Value.
                    switch (state)
                    {
                        case State_Zero: return false;
                        case State_X: return false;
                        case State_Value: break;
                    }
                }
                break;
            default: return false;
        }
    }

    return state == State_Value;
}

If I can garner correctly as to what you are trying to achieve maybe this function will suite your needs better:

static bool ParseNumber(string value, out int result)
{
    if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(value))
    {
        result = 0;
        return false;
    }

    if (value.StartsWith("0x"))
        return int.TryParse(value.Substring(2), NumberStyles.AllowHexSpecifier, null, out result);
    else
        return int.TryParse(value, NumberStyles.Integer, CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, out result);
}

Just for kicks I went and profiled:

Results on my laptop (Release/no debugger):

  • Regex with no compiled/cached Regex took 8137ms (2x cached, 20x hand-written)
  • Regex with compiled/cached Regex took 3463ms (8x hand-written)
  • Hand-written took 397ms (1x)
share|improve this answer
    
Very interesting read, +1. Strange though that you manage to get so much performance gain with compiled regexes. My measurements on a test set of 10,000 strings, 50-5000 each and 2% wrong showed your hand-written 200ms, my optimized regex compiled static 780ms, compiled stack 630ms, uncompiled 640ms. Apparently, compiling doesn't always help (MS states that it is cached anyway). –  Abel Feb 8 '12 at 12:56
    
@Abel the performance gains are drastically smaller if you compile under debug and have a debugger attached (CTRL+F5 instead of F5 should sort that out). –  Jonathan Dickinson Feb 8 '12 at 13:25
    
Normally I would totally agree with you, but it simply doesn't improve: configuration on Debug or Release in this case doesn't seem to matter. Though I did notice an error on the compiled regex, forgot RegexOptions.Compiled. This improved from 640 to 560ms (either Debug or Release). Still, your by-hand approach is by far the fastest ;) –  Abel Feb 8 '12 at 14:10

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