Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to understand how to use scalaz State to perform a complicated stateful computation. Here is the problem:

Given a List[Int] of potential divisors and a List[Int] of numbers, find a List[(Int, Int)] of matching pairs (divisor, number) where a divisor is allowed to match at most one number.

As a test:

def findMatches(divs: List[Int], nums: List[Int]): List[(Int, Int)]

And with the following input:

findMatches( List(2, 3, 4), List(1, 6, 7, 8, 9) )

We can get at most 3 matches. If we stipulate that the matches must be made in the order in which they occur traversing the lists l-r, then the matches must be:

List( (2, 6) ,  (3, 9) , (4, 8) )

So the following two tests need to pass:

assert(findMatches(List(2, 3, 4), List(1, 6, 7, 8, 9)) == List((2, 6), (3, 9), (4, 8)))
assert(findMatches(List(2, 3, 4), List(1, 6, 7, 8, 11)) == List((2, 6),  (4, 8)))

Here's an imperative solution:

scala> def findMatches(divs: List[Int], nums: List[Int]): List[(Int, Int)] = {
     |   var matches = List.empty[(Int, Int)]
     |   var remaining = nums
     |   divs foreach { div =>
     |     remaining find (_ % div == 0) foreach { n => 
     |       remaining = remaining filterNot (_ ==  n)
     |       matches = matches ::: List(div -> n) 
     |     }
     |   }
     |   matches
     | }
findMatches: (divs: List[Int], nums: List[Int])List[(Int, Int)]

Notice that I have to update the state of remaining as well as accumulating matches. It sounds like a job for scalaz traverse!

My useless working has got me this far:

scala> def findMatches(divs: List[Int], nums: List[Int]): List[(Int, Int)] = {
     | divs.traverse[({type l[a] = State[List[Int], a]})#l, Int]( div =>
     | state { (rem: List[Int]) => rem.find(_ % div == 0).map(n => rem.filterNot(_ == n) -> List(div -> n)).getOrElse(rem -> List.empty[(Int, Int)]) }
     | ) ~> nums
     | }
<console>:15: error: type mismatch;
 found   : List[(Int, Int)]
 required: Int
       state { (rem: List[Int]) => rem.find(_ % div == 0).map(n => rem.filterNot(_ == n) -> List(div -> n)).getOrElse(rem -> List.empty[(Int, Int)]) }
                                                                                                                                       ^
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Your code only needs to be slightly modified in order to use State and Traverse:

// using scalaz-seven
import scalaz._
import Scalaz._

def findMatches(divs: List[Int], nums: List[Int]) = {

  // the "state" we carry when traversing
  case class S(matches: List[(Int, Int)], remaining: List[Int])

  // initially there are no found pairs and a full list of nums
  val initialState = S(List[(Int, Int)](), nums)

  // a function to find a pair (div, num) given the current "state"
  // we return a state transition that modifies the state
  def find(div: Int) = modify((s: S) => 
    s.remaining.find(_ % div == 0).map { (n: Int) => 
      S(s.matches :+ div -> n, s.remaining -n)
    }.getOrElse(s))

  // the traversal, with no type annotation thanks to Scalaz7
  // Note that we use `exec` to get the final state
  // instead of `eval` that would just give us a List[Unit].
  divs.traverseS(find).exec(initialState).matches
}

// List((2,6), (3,9), (4,8))
findMatches(List(2, 3, 4), List(1, 6, 7, 8, 9))

You can also use runTraverseS to write the traversal a bit differently:

 divs.runTraverseS(initialState)(find)._2.matches
share|improve this answer
    
Don't you have the pair the wrong way round? I though State took a function S => (S, A). It seems you are returning (A, S) –  oxbow_lakes Feb 8 '12 at 14:00
    
Ah - seems this might have changed in scalaz7. Looks like State is also an alias for StateT[Id, S, A]. Sheesh –  oxbow_lakes Feb 8 '12 at 14:07
    
Eric - does this definitely work? Can you show me in a REPL? I converted it to scalaz6 and I get duplicates! The reason is that the match is being held as a List[(Int, Int)] rather than an Option[(Int, Int)] –  oxbow_lakes Feb 8 '12 at 14:20
    
Apologies - you already explained the "incremental list of matches" issue. I've converted your example to scalaz 6 below –  oxbow_lakes Feb 8 '12 at 14:28
2  
Cleaned this answer up a little. –  Apocalisp Feb 8 '12 at 16:54

I have finally figured this out after much messing about:

scala> def findMatches(divs: List[Int], nums: List[Int]): List[(Int, Int)] = {
     | (divs.traverse[({type l[a] = State[List[Int], a]})#l, Option[(Int, Int)]]( div =>
     |   state { (rem: List[Int]) => 
     |     rem.find(_ % div == 0).map(n => rem.filterNot(_ == n) -> Some(div -> n)).getOrElse(rem -> none[(Int, Int)]) 
     |   }
     | ) ! nums).flatten
     | }
findMatches: (divs: List[Int], nums: List[Int])List[(Int, Int)]

I think I'll be looking at Eric's answer for more insight into what is actually going on, though.


Iteration #2

Exploring Eric's answer using scalaz6

scala> def findMatches2(divs: List[Int], nums: List[Int]): List[(Int, Int)] = {
     |   case class S(matches: List[(Int, Int)], remaining: List[Int])
     |   val initialState = S(nil[(Int, Int)], nums)
     |   def find(div: Int, s: S) = {
     |     val newState = s.remaining.find(_ % div == 0).map { (n: Int) =>
     |       S(s.matches :+ div -> n, s.remaining filterNot (_ ==  n))
     |     }.getOrElse(s)
     |     newState -> newState.matches
     |   }
     |   val findDivs = (div: Int) => state((s: S) => find(div, s))
     |   (divs.traverse[({type l[a]=State[S, a]})#l, List[(Int, Int)]](findDivs) ! initialState).join
     | }
findMatches2: (divs: List[Int], nums: List[Int])List[(Int, Int)]

scala> findMatches2(List(2, 3, 4), List(1, 6, 7, 8, 9))
res11: List[(Int, Int)] = List((2,6), (2,6), (3,9), (2,6), (3,9), (4,8))

The join on the List[List[(Int, Int)]] at the end is causing grief. Instead we can replace the last line with:

(divs.traverse[({type l[a]=State[S, a]})#l, List[(Int, Int)]](findDivs) ~> initialState).matches

Iteration #3

In fact, you can do away with the extra output of a state computation altogether and simplify even further:

scala> def findMatches2(divs: List[Int], nums: List[Int]): List[(Int, Int)] = {
     | case class S(matches: List[(Int, Int)], remaining: List[Int])
     | def find(div: Int, s: S) =
     |   s.remaining.find(_ % div == 0).map( n => S(s.matches :+ div -> n, s.remaining filterNot (_ ==  n)) ).getOrElse(s) -> ()
     | (divs.traverse[({type l[a]=State[S, a]})#l, Unit](div => state((s: S) => find(div, s))) ~> S(nil[(Int, Int)], nums)).matches
     | }
findMatches2: (divs: List[Int], nums: List[Int])List[(Int, Int)]

Iteration #4

modify described above by Apocalisp is also available in scalaz6 and removes the need to explicitly supply the (S, ()) pair (although you do need Unit in the type lambda):

scala> def findMatches2(divs: List[Int], nums: List[Int]): List[(Int, Int)] = {
     | case class S(matches: List[(Int, Int)], remaining: List[Int])
     | def find(div: Int) = modify( (s: S) =>
     |   s.remaining.find(_ % div == 0).map( n => S(s.matches :+ div -> n, s.remaining filterNot (_ ==  n)) ).getOrElse(s))
     | (divs.traverse[({type l[a]=State[S, a]})#l, Unit](div => state(s => find(div)(s))) ~> S(nil, nums)).matches
     | }
findMatches2: (divs: List[Int], nums: List[Int])List[(Int, Int)]

scala> findMatches2(List(2, 3, 4), List(1, 6, 7, 8, 9))
res0: List[(Int, Int)] = List((2,6), (3,9), (4,8))
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.