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I'm new to linq. In c# I'm doing as follows to get the count of one column.

SELECT   DispatcherName,
         ActivityType,
         CONVERT(BIGINT,COUNT(ActivityType)) AS Total
FROM     ACTIVITYLOG
GROUP BY DispatcherName,
         ActivityType
ORDER BY Total DESC

Can any one tell m,how I can achieve the same thing using LINQ.

Update:

HI I did as follows and got the reslut. But I'm not able to convert result to datatable. this is how I did. here dt is datatabe with two columns Dispatchername and ActivityType.

 var query1 = from p in dt.AsEnumerable()
                             group p by new
                             {
                                 DispatcherName = p.Field<string>("Dispatchername"),
                                 Activity = p.Field<string>("ActivityType"),
                             }
                                 into pgroup
                                 let count = pgroup.Count()
                                 orderby count
                                 select new
                                 {
                                     Count = count,
                                     DispatcherName = pgroup.Key.DispatcherName,
                                     Activity = pgroup.Key.Activity
                                 };

pls help me out asap.

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you want your results returned back to a DataTable, one option is to use the CopyToDataTable method.

Here's a live example: http://rextester.com/XHX48973

This method basically requires you to create a dummy table in order to use its NewRow method - the only way to create a DataRow, which is required by CopyToDataTable.

var result = dt.AsEnumerable()
    .GroupBy(p => new { 
           DispatcherName = p.Field<string>("DispatcherName"),
           Activity = p.Field<string>("ActivityType")})
    .Select(p => {
      var row = dummy.NewRow();
        row["Activity"] = p.Key.Activity;
        row["DispatcherName"] = p.Key.DispatcherName;
        row["Count"] = p.Count();
        return row;
    })
    .CopyToDataTable();

Perhaps a better way might be just fill in the rows directly, by converting to a List<T> and then using ForEach.

DataTable dummy = new DataTable();
dummy.Columns.Add("DispatcherName",typeof(string));
dummy.Columns.Add("Activity",typeof(string));
dummy.Columns.Add("Count",typeof(int));

dt.AsEnumerable()
    .GroupBy(p => new { DispatcherName = p.Field<string>("DispatcherName"),
        Activity = p.Field<string>("ActivityType")})
    .ToList()
    .ForEach(p => {
      var row = dummy.NewRow();
        row["Activity"] = p.Key.Activity;
        row["DispatcherName"] = p.Key.DispatcherName;
        row["Count"] = p.Count();
        dummy.Rows.Add(row);
    });

Live example: http://rextester.com/TFZNEO48009

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Thank you very much. Can you tell me pls how to sort result by count desc order? –  Ram Feb 8 '12 at 14:45
    
@Ram Here you go msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb546145.aspx –  Hanlet Escaño Feb 8 '12 at 14:57
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from c in ACTIVITYLOG
group c by new {c.DispatcherName, c.ActivityType} into g
orderby g.Count() descending
select new { g.Key.DispatcherName, g.Key.ActivityType, Total = g.Count() }
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1  
Masterful. +1 I'm still learning LINQ, and the use of the "new" keyword in this context is awesome. +woot –  Nick Vaccaro Feb 8 '12 at 14:01
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This should do the trick:

 IList<ACTIVITYLOG> allActivityLogs;
            var result = (from c in allActivityLogs
                          select new
                          {
                              DispatcherName = c.DispatcherName,
                              ActivityType = c.ActivityType,
                              Total = c.ActivityType.Count
                          }).OrderByDescending(x => x.Total)
                         .GroupBy(x => new { x.DispatcherName, x.ActivityType });

You only need to substitute the allActivityLogs collection with the actual collection of your entities.

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1  
I dont think this will "do the trick" For starters what makes you think his ActivityType property has a Count? –  Jamiec Feb 8 '12 at 13:59
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