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Suppose I have a garden-variety closure like this bare-bones sample:

(let ((alpha 0) #| etc. |# )
  (lambda ()
    (incf alpha)
    #| more code here |#
    alpha))

Suppose I (funcall) an instance of that closure three times, and in the middle of the third execution, this closure wants to save itself somewhere (in a hash table, say). Then I don't (funcall) this instance for a while. Then I retrieve this instance from the hash table and (funcall) it again, getting the returned value of 4.

How does the function in the closure refer to itself, so it can save itself in that hash table?

EDIT 1: Here's a more detailed example. I accomplish the goal by passing the closure to itself as a parameter. But I'd like the closure to do all this to itself without being self-parameterized.

 1 (defparameter *listeriosis* nil)
 2 (defparameter *a*
 3   (lambda ()
 4     (let ((count 0))
 5       (lambda (param1 param2 param3 self)
 6         (incf count)
 7         (when (= 3 count)
 8           (push self *listeriosis*)
 9           (push self *listeriosis*)
10           (push self *listeriosis*))
11         count))))
12 (let ((bee (funcall *a*)))
13   (princ (funcall bee 1 2 3 bee)) (terpri)
14   (princ (funcall bee 1 2 3 bee)) (terpri)
15   (princ (funcall bee 1 2 3 bee)) (terpri)
16   (princ (funcall bee 1 2 3 bee)) (terpri)
17   (princ (funcall bee 1 2 3 bee)) (terpri))
18 (princ "///") (terpri)
19 (princ (funcall (pop *listeriosis*) 1 2 3 nil)) (terpri)
20 (princ (funcall (pop *listeriosis*) 1 2 3 nil)) (terpri)
21 (princ (funcall (pop *listeriosis*) 1 2 3 nil)) (terpri)
1
2
3
4
5
///
6
7
8

EDIT 2: Yes, I know I can use a macro to slip the name of the function in as its first parameter, and then use that macro instead of (funcall), but I'd still like to know how to let a closure refer to its own instance.

EDIT 3: In response to SK-logic's kind suggestion, I did the following, but it doesn't do what I want. It pushes three new closures on the stack, not three references to the same closure. See how when I pop those off the stack, the values of the calls are 1, 1, and 1 instead of 6, 7, and 8?

 1 (defparameter *listeriosis* nil)
 2 (defun Y (f) 
 3   ((lambda (x) (funcall x x)) 
 4    (lambda (y) 
 5      (funcall f (lambda (&rest args) 
 6                (apply (funcall y y) args))))))
 7 (defparameter *a*
 8   (lambda (self)
 9     (let ((count 0))
10       (lambda (param1 param2 param3)
11         (incf count)
12         (when (= 3 count)
13           (push self *listeriosis*)
14           (push self *listeriosis*)
15           (push self *listeriosis*))
16         count))))
17 (let ((bee (Y *a*)))
18   (princ (funcall bee 1 2 3 #| bee |# )) (terpri)
19   (princ (funcall bee 1 2 3 #| bee |# )) (terpri)
20   (princ (funcall bee 1 2 3 #| bee |# )) (terpri)
21   (princ (funcall bee 1 2 3 #| bee |# )) (terpri)
22   (princ (funcall bee 1 2 3 #| bee |# )) (terpri))
23 (princ "///") (terpri)
24 (princ (funcall (pop *listeriosis*) 1 2 3)) (terpri)
25 (princ (funcall (pop *listeriosis*) 1 2 3)) (terpri)
26 (princ (funcall (pop *listeriosis*) 1 2 3)) (terpri)
1
2
3
4
5
///
1
1
1

EDIT 4: Jon O's suggestion hit the mark exactly. Here's the code and output:

 1 (defparameter *listeriosis* nil)
 2 (defparameter *a*
 3   (lambda ()
 4     (let ((count 0))
 5       (labels ((self (param1 param2 param3)
 6                  (incf count)
 7                  (when (= 3 count)
 8                    (push (function self) *listeriosis*)
 9                    (push (function self) *listeriosis*)
10                    (push (function self) *listeriosis*))
11                  count))
12         (function self)))))
13 (let ((bee (funcall *a*)))
14   (princ (funcall bee 1 2 3)) (terpri)
15   (princ (funcall bee 1 2 3)) (terpri)
16   (princ (funcall bee 1 2 3)) (terpri)
17   (princ (funcall bee 1 2 3)) (terpri)
18   (princ (funcall bee 1 2 3)) (terpri))
19 (princ "///") (terpri)
20 (princ (funcall (pop *listeriosis*) 1 2 3)) (terpri)
21 (princ (funcall (pop *listeriosis*) 1 2 3)) (terpri)
22 (princ (funcall (pop *listeriosis*) 1 2 3)) (terpri)
1
2
3
4
5
///
6
7
8

EDIT 5: Miron's suggestion also hits the mark, and actually makes the code a bit more readable:

 1 (defmacro alambda (parms &body body)
 2   `(labels ((self ,parms ,@body))
 3     #'self))
 4 ;
 5 (defparameter *listeriosis* nil)
 6 (defparameter *a*
 7   (lambda ()
 8     (let ((count 0))
 9       (alambda (param1 param2 param3)
10         (incf count)
11         (when (= 3 count)
12           (push #'self *listeriosis*)
13           (push #'self *listeriosis*)
14           (push #'self *listeriosis*))
15         count))))
16 ;
17 (let ((bee (funcall *a*)))
18   (princ (funcall bee 1 2 3)) (terpri)
19   (princ (funcall bee 1 2 3)) (terpri)
20   (princ (funcall bee 1 2 3)) (terpri)
21   (princ (funcall bee 1 2 3)) (terpri)
22   (princ (funcall bee 1 2 3)) (terpri))
23 (princ "///") (terpri)
24 (princ (funcall (pop *listeriosis*) 1 2 3)) (terpri)
25 (princ (funcall (pop *listeriosis*) 1 2 3)) (terpri)
26 (princ (funcall (pop *listeriosis*) 1 2 3)) (terpri)
1
2
3
4
5
///
6
7
8
share|improve this question
    
I assume by "closure" you mean "anonymous function". In any case, I don't see why you wouldn't simply give it a name? –  delnan Feb 8 '12 at 14:04
    
I don't want a new instance of the closure. I want the old one, with continued changes to the enclosing variables. In fact, there might be several instances, each of which should be salted away somewhere. Can all this be done while giving it a name? What would the syntax be? –  Bill Evans at Mariposa Feb 8 '12 at 14:07
    
I don't speak lisp very well, but I suppose something like the "self-executing function expressions" common in JavaScript would do the trick. –  delnan Feb 8 '12 at 14:08
1  
What you're looking for is a fixed-point combinator: rosettacode.org/wiki/Y_combinator#Common_Lisp –  SK-logic Feb 8 '12 at 14:47
1  
@BillEvansatMariposa, define your closure as (lambda (self) (lambda (args ...) ...)), and then apply Y as (Y #'whatever) and store the result. Then, self will be a reference to the closure itself. –  SK-logic Feb 8 '12 at 15:25

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

What about alambda (also in On Lisp)?

;; Graham's alambda
(defmacro alambda (parms &body body)
  `(labels ((self ,parms ,@body))
     #'self))
share|improve this answer
    
I've used this in EDIT 5 of the question. It actually makes the code even more readable. Thanks! –  Bill Evans at Mariposa Feb 9 '12 at 0:11
2  
Well, it's the most general implementation for the 'labels' idea. You could also find blambda useful, where you get to also name self. See Alexandria for more examples of this (look for if-let). –  Miron Brezuleanu Feb 9 '12 at 6:43
2  
Example blambda: (defmacro blambda (fn-name args &body body) `(labels ((,fn-name ,args ,@body)) #',fn-name)), used in (funcall (blambda fact (x) (if (= 0 x) 1 (* x (fact (1- x))))) 5) –  Miron Brezuleanu Feb 9 '12 at 6:43

I don't think you need to go as far as defining the Y combinator for yourself in order to do this; the built in labels form will create the self-referential bindings you need. According to the HyperSpec:

"labels is equivalent to flet except that the scope of the defined function names for labels encompasses the function definitions themselves as well as the body."

Here's everyone's favorite toy closure example, showing how the locally-defined f closes over its own binding:

(defun make-counter (n)
   (labels ((f () (values (incf n) (function f))))
     (function f)))

This returns a closure which returns two values: the new value of the counter, and its own function value. Example use:

CL-USER> (setq g (make-counter 5))
#<FUNCTION F NIL (BLOCK F (VALUES (INCF N) #'F))>
CL-USER> (multiple-value-bind (n q) (funcall g) (list n (funcall q)))
(6 7)

It should be straightforward to extend that to storing the closure in a data structure instead of returning it.

share|improve this answer
    
Perfect! (See the results in the edited question.) Thank you! –  Bill Evans at Mariposa Feb 8 '12 at 16:08
    
Glad it was helpful! –  Jon O. Feb 8 '12 at 16:56
1  
@Bill: Related (but not duplicate): stackoverflow.com/q/7936024/13, which explains why labels or letrec or Y combinator or the like is required. (Disclosure: I wrote the accepted answer.) –  Chris Jester-Young Feb 8 '12 at 17:17

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