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Imagine two positive integers A and B. I want to combine these two into a single integer C.

There can be no other integers D and E which combine to C. So combining them with the addition operator doesn't work. Eg 30 + 10 = 40 = 40 + 0 = 39 + 1 Neither does concatination work. Eg "31" + "2" = 312 = "3" + "12"

This combination operation should also be deterministic (always yield the same result with the same inputs) and should always yield an integer on either the positive or the negative side of integers.

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5  
You should clarify if you mean integers in software or integers in math. In software, you pick any integer type and it will have a size, so you have a finite number of them, so there is no solution (unless, of course, your input data is guaranteed to be within some range and your output can be any integer). In math see ASk's solution. –  Daniel Daranas May 28 '09 at 7:51
    
I'm talking about bounded integers in a low, positive range. Say 0 to 10,000 –  harm May 31 '09 at 22:36
14  
@harm: So how about just 10,001*A + B? –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft Jul 12 '11 at 23:34

14 Answers 14

up vote 77 down vote accepted

You're looking for a bijective NxN -> N mapping. These are used for e.g. dovetailing. Have a look at this PDF for an introduction to so-called pairing functions. Wikipedia introduces a specific pairing function, namely the Cantor pairing function:

  • pi(k1, k2) = 1/2(k1 + k2)(k1 + k2 + 1) + k2

Three remarks:

  • As others have made clear, if you plan to implement a pairing function, you may soon find you need arbitrarily large integers (bignums).
  • If you don't want to make a distinction between the pairs (a, b) and (b, a), then sort a and b before applying the pairing function.
  • Actually I lied. You are looking for a bijective ZxZ -> N mapping. Cantor's function only works on non-negative numbers. This is not a problem however, because it's easy to define a bijection f : Z -> N, like so:
    • f(n) = n * 2 if n >= 0
    • f(n) = -n * 2 - 1 if n < 0
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7  
+1 I think this is the correct answer for unbounded integers. –  Unknown May 28 '09 at 7:53
2  
How can i get again value of k1, k2 ? –  MinuMaster Apr 22 '12 at 11:18
1  
@MinuMaster: that is described in the same Wikipedia article, under Inverting the Cantor pairing function. –  Stephan202 Apr 23 '12 at 13:51
3  
See also Szudzik's function, explained by newfal below. –  OliJG Dec 18 '12 at 7:35
    
While this is correct for unbounded integers, it's not best for bounded integers. I think @blue-raja's comment makes the most sense by far. –  Kardasis Jul 16 '13 at 13:00

Cantor pairing function is really one of the better ones out there considering its simple, fast and space efficient, but there is something even better published at Wolfram by Matthew Szudzik, here. The limitation of Cantor pairing function (relatively) is that the range of encoded results doesn't always stay within the limits of a 2N bit integer if the inputs are two N bit integers. That is, if my inputs are two 16 bit integers ranging from 0 to 2^16 -1, then there are 2^16 * (2^16 -1) combinations of inputs possible, so by the obvious Pigeonhole Principle, we need an output of size at least 2^16 * (2^16 -1), which is equal to 2^32 - 2^16, or in other words, a map of 32 bit numbers should be feasible ideally. This may not be of little practical importance in programming world.

Cantor pairing function:

(a + b) * (a + b + 1) / 2 + a; where a, b >= 0

The mapping for two maximum most 16 bit integers (65535, 65535) will be 8589803520 which as you see cannot be fit into 32 bits.

Enter Szudzik's function:

a >= b ? a * a + a + b : a + b * b;  where a, b >= 0

The mapping for (65535, 65535) will now be 4294967295 which as you see is a 32 bit (0 to 2^32 -1) integer. This is where this solution is ideal, it simply utilizes every single point in that space, so nothing can get more space efficient.


Now considering the fact that we typically deal with the signed implementations of numbers of various sizes in languages/frameworks, let's consider signed 16 bit integers ranging from -(2^15) to 2^15 -1 (later we'll see how to extend even the ouput to span over signed range). Since a and b have to be positive they range from 0 to 2^15 - 1.

Cantor pairing function:

The mapping for two maximum most 16 bit signed integers (32767, 32767) will be 2147418112 which is just short of maximum value for signed 32 bit integer.

Now Szudzik's function:

(32767, 32767) => 1073741823, much smaller..

Let's account for negative integers. That's beyond the original question I know, but just elaborating to help future visitors.

Cantor pairing function:

A = a >= 0 ? 2 * a : -2 * a - 1;
B = b >= 0 ? 2 * b : -2 * b - 1;
(A + B) * (A + B + 1) / 2 + A;

(-32768, -32768) => 8589803520 which is Int64. 64 bit output for 16 bit inputs may be so unpardonable!!

Szudzik's function:

A = a >= 0 ? 2 * a : -2 * a - 1;
B = b >= 0 ? 2 * b : -2 * b - 1;
A >= B ? A * A + A + B : A + B * B;

(-32768, -32768) => 4294967295 which is 32 bit for unsigned range or 64 bit for signed range, but still better.

Now all this while the output has always been positive. In signed world, it will be even more space saving if we could transfer half the output to negative axis. You could do it like this for Szudzik's:

A = a >= 0 ? 2 * a : -2 * a - 1;
B = b >= 0 ? 2 * b : -2 * b - 1;
C = (A >= B ? A * A + A + B : A + B * B) / 2;
a < 0 && b < 0 || a >= 0 && b >= 0 ? C : -C - 1;

(-32768, 32767) => -2147483648

(32767, -32768) => -2147450880

(0, 0) => 0 

(32767, 32767) => 2147418112

(-32768, -32768) => 2147483647

What I do: After applying a weight of 2 to the the inputs and going through the function, I then divide the ouput by two and take some of them to negative axis by multiplying by -1.

See the results, for any input in the range of a signed 16 bit number, the output lies within the limits of a signed 32 bit integer which is cool. I'm not sure how to go about the same way for Cantor pairing function but didn't try as much as its not as efficient. Furthermore, more calculations involved in Cantor pairing function means its slower too.

Here is a C# implementation.

public static long PerfectlyHashThem(int a, int b)
{
    var A = (ulong)(a >= 0 ? 2 * (long)a : -2 * (long)a - 1);
    var B = (ulong)(b >= 0 ? 2 * (long)b : -2 * (long)b - 1);
    var C = (long)((A >= B ? A * A + A + B : A + B * B) / 2);
    return a < 0 && b < 0 || a >= 0 && b >= 0 ? C : -C - 1;
}

public static int PerfectlyHashThem(short a, short b)
{
    var A = (uint)(a >= 0 ? 2 * a : -2 * a - 1);
    var B = (uint)(b >= 0 ? 2 * b : -2 * b - 1);
    var C = (int)((A >= B ? A * A + A + B : A + B * B) / 2);
    return a < 0 && b < 0 || a >= 0 && b >= 0 ? C : -C - 1;
}

Since the intermediate calculations can exceed limits of 2N signed integer, I have used 4N integer type (the last division by 2 brings back the result to 2N).

The link I have provided on alternate solution nicely depicts a graph of the function utilizing every single point in space. Its amazing to see that you could uniquely encode a pair of coordinates to a single number reversibly! Magic world of numbers!!

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2  
That was amazing. Thanks a lot for sharing! –  harm Dec 15 '12 at 9:32
    
Hmm.. How do I award the Rockstar badge? –  Mithon Jan 24 '13 at 18:24
2  
What would be the modified unhash function for signed integers? –  Noetic Jun Dec 3 '13 at 10:28
    
This answer confuses me. If you want to map (0,0) thru (65535,65535) to a single number, then a<<16 + b is better in basically every way (faster, simpler, easier to understand, more obvious). If you want (-32768,-32768) to (327687,327687) instead, just subject 32768 first. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft May 15 at 15:28
    
@BlueRaja-DannyPflughoeft you're right. My answer would be valid if range is not limited or unknown. I will update it. I had written it before limit mattered to me. Editing this answer is long been in my mind. I will find time sometime soon. –  nawfal May 15 at 16:09

If A and B can be expressed with 2 bytes, you can combine them on 4 bytes. Put A on the most significant half and B on the least significant half.

In C language this gives (assuming sizeof(short)=2 and sizeof(int)=4):

int combine(short A, short B)
{
    return A<<16 | B;
}

short getA(int C)
{
    return C>>16;
}

short getB(int C)
{
    return C & 0xFFFF;
}
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1  
combine() should return (unsigned short)(A<<16) | (unsigned short)(B); So that negative numbers can be packed properly. –  Andy Jan 2 '13 at 19:16

Is this even possible?
You are combining two integers. They both have the range -2,147,483,648 to 2,147,483,647 but you will only take the positives. That makes 2147483647^2 = 4,61169E+18 combinations. Since each combination has to be unique AND result in an integer, you'll need some kind of magical integer that can contain this amount of numbers.

Or is my logic flawed?

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+1 That's what I think too (although I did the calculation saying the order of A and B don't matter) –  lc. May 28 '09 at 7:50
3  
Yes your logic is correct by the pigeonhole principle. Unforunately the asker did not specify if the integer is bounded or not. –  Unknown May 28 '09 at 7:56
    
Yes, I had that afterthought too, but I thought the message is in essence the same, so I didn't bother recalcing. –  Boris Callens May 28 '09 at 8:03
    
Also I just realized I should pick up my chance calculation (literal translation from Dutch) textbooks again. –  Boris Callens May 28 '09 at 8:04
1  
@Boris: Kansrekening is "probability theory". –  Stephan202 May 28 '09 at 8:09

Let number a be the first, b the second. Let p be the a+1-th prime number, q be the b+1-th prime number

Then, the result is pq, if a<b, or 2pq if a>b. If a=b, let it be p^2.

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2  
I doubt that you'd want a NP solution. –  user44242 May 28 '09 at 7:58
    
Doesn't this produce the same result for a=5, b=14 and a=6, b=15? –  Lieven Keersmaekers May 28 '09 at 8:31
3  
Two products of two different primes can't have the same result (unique prime factor decomposition) a=5, b=14 -> result is 13*47 = 611 a=6, b=15 -> result is 17*53 = 901 –  ASk May 28 '09 at 9:34

The standard mathematical way for positive integers is to use the uniqueness of prime factorization.

f( x, y ) -> 2^x * 3^y

The downside is that the image tends to span quite a large range of integers so when it comes to expressing the mapping in a computer algorithm you may have issues with choosing an appropriate type for the result.

You could modify this to deal with negative x and y by encoding a flags with powers of 5 and 7 terms.

e.g.

f( x, y ) -> 2^|x| * 3^|y| * 5^(x<0) * 7^(y<0)
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The math is fine. But, as Boris says, if you want to run this as a computer program, you have to take into account the finiteness of the machine. The algorithm will work correctly for a subset of the integers representable in the relevant machine. –  Yuval F May 28 '09 at 7:52
    
I did state this in my second paragraph. The tags on the question indicate 'algorithm', 'mathematical' and 'deterministic', not any particular language. The input range may not be limited and the environment might have an unbounded integer type 'bigint'. –  Charles Bailey May 28 '09 at 8:16

f(a, b) = s(a+b) + a, where s(n) = n*(n+1)/2

  • This is a function -- it is deterministic.
  • It is also injective -- f maps different values for different (a,b) pairs. You can prove this using the fact: s(a+b+1)-s(a+b) = a+b+1 < a.
  • It returns quite small values -- good if your are going to use it for array indexing, as the array does not have to be big.
  • It is cache-friendly -- if two (a, b) pairs are close to each other, then f maps numbers to them which are close to each other (compared to other methods).

I did not understand what You mean by:

should always yield an integer on either the positive or the negative side of integers

How can I write (greater than), (less than) characters in this forum?

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1  
Greater than and less than characters should work fine within backtick escapes. –  TRiG Dec 1 '10 at 16:39

For positive integers as arguments and where argument order doesn't matter:

  1. Here's an unordered pairing function:

    <x, y> = x * y + trunc((|x - y| - 1)^2 / 4) = <y, x>
    
  2. For x ≠ y, here's a unique unordered pairing function:

    <x, y> = if x < y:
               x * (y - 1) + trunc((y - x - 2)^2 / 4)
             if x > y:
               (x - 1) * y + trunc((x - y - 2)^2 / 4)
           = <y, x>
    
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Check this: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pigeonhole_principle. If A, B and C are of same type, it cannot be done. If A and B are 16-bit integers, and C is 32-bit, then you can simply use shifting.

The very nature of hashing algorithms is that they cannot provide a unique hash for each different input.

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It isn't that tough to construct a mapping:

   1  2  3  4  5  use this mapping if (a,b) != (b,a)
1  0  1  3  6 10
2  2  4  7 11 16
3  5  8 12 17 23
4  9 13 18 24 31
5 14 19 25 32 40

   1  2  3  4  5 use this mapping if (a,b) == (b,a) (mirror)
1  0  1  2  4  6
2  1  3  5  7 10
3  2  5  8 11 14
4  4  8 11 15 19
5  6 10 14 19 24


    0  1 -1  2 -2 use this if you need negative/positive
 0  0  1  2  4  6
 1  1  3  5  7 10
-1  2  5  8 11 14
 2  4  8 11 15 19
-2  6 10 14 19 24

Figuring out how to get the value for an arbitrary a,b is a little more difficult.

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I guess we could map ZxZ -> Z, by using only one axis with 0 1 -1 2 -2 etc.. –  j4n bur53 Jun 20 at 8:53

Although Stephan202's answer is the only truly general one, for integers in a bounded range you can do better. For example, if your range is 0..10,000, then you can do:

#define RANGE_MIN 0
#define RANGE_MAX 10000

unsigned int merge(unsigned int x, unsigned int y)
{
    return (x * (RANGE_MAX - RANGE_MIN + 1)) + y;
}

void split(unsigned int v, unsigned int &x, unsigned int &y)
{
    x = RANGE_MIN + (v / (RANGE_MAX - RANGE_MIN + 1));
    y = RANGE_MIN + (v % (RANGE_MAX - RANGE_MIN + 1));
}

Results can fit in a single integer for a range up to the square root of the integer type's cardinality. This packs slightly more efficiently than Stephan202's more general method. It is also considerably simpler to decode; requiring no square roots, for starters :)

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Perhaps you should read up on hash functions, especially perfect hashes? Wikipedia has some nice high-level descriptions with links to implementations and more detailed articles.

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What you suggest is impossible. You will always have collisions.

In order to map two objects to another single set, the mapped set must have a minimum size of the number of combinations expected:

Assuming a 32-bit integer, you have 2147483647 positive integers. Choosing two of these where order doesn't matter and with repetition yields 2305843008139952128 combinations. This does not fit nicely in the set of 32-bit integers.

You can, however fit this mapping in 61 bits. Using a 64-bit integer is probably easiest. Set the high word to the smaller integer and the low word to the larger one.

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I think you can write less than with & l t; and right than with & g t; if there is not html char parsing, but probably there is, I will try to cheat: 5 < 6 & 6 > 5. ( Of course, avoid the space between the characters, if it works, you will see the symbols, not the code )

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