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There is my question: I wonder why using a RVM .gems (see http://beginrescueend.com/gemsets/initial/ to know what I'm tlaking about) in a Rails app while we use Gemfile to install our gems in our project?

I think that could be useful when deploying a project for the first time and ensure (eg.) bundler is installed before running (automatically?) a command like bundle install through the .rvmrc file.

I am right? Is there any use case I am missing?

In short, I want to know what is the interest of *.gems file?

Thanks in advance for all your help that will make me learn a lot ;)

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question needs more clarification, specifically around "I wonder why useing an RVM .gems in a Rails app while we use Gemfile to install our gems in our project" –  Mike K. Feb 8 '12 at 16:02
    
In short, I want to know what is the interest of *.gems file? –  Adrien Feb 8 '12 at 17:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Using .gems and Gemfile is rather explicit, You need only one of them, .gems file is more useful for small projects or even for your preferred gems, mostly when there is not much dependencies, in contrary Gemfile brings strict dependency management ensuring you will always get proper versions of gems (assuming Gemfile.lock is also used)

There is good support for generating .rvmrc in development version of rvm, it will detect if you have *.gems or Gemfile and include proper code like bundle install in .rvmrc:

rvm get head
cd /path/to/project
rvm --rvmrc --create --install 1.9.3@project

Review the new generated .rvmrc file and remove the parts that are not important for you.

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Great! Thanks! It confirms my mind. I wanted to have some confirmations from any expert :) –  Adrien Feb 10 '12 at 13:03

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