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I am making a simulation of an ecosystem, it's very simple so don't worry about realism. The reproduction method is located in the Organism class, it could be used exactly by the class Plant, except for the return type which is Organism:

    public Organism Reproduce()
    {
        double[] copy = new double[genes.Count];
        for(int i = 0; i < copy.Length; i++)
            // 10% chance to mutate, change up to 10%
            copy[i] = genes[i] + (Program.rand.Next(10) < 1 ? 
                genes[i] * 0.2 * (Program.rand.NextDouble() - 0.5) : 0.0);
        return new Organism(genes);
    }

I know in Ruby it's possible to return 'self' so if the method is used by a class that extends this one, the method will return an object of the inheriting class.

So the question is: How can I modify this method so that when it's called from a Plant, it will make a Plant and return one?

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You will need to use generics. The simplest way would be to make just this method generic. The one issue you will come across is that you must have a public parameter-less constructor.

public TOrganism Reproduce<TOrganism>()
    where TOrganism : Organism, new()
{
    double[] copy = new double[genes.Count];
    for(int i = 0; i < copy.Length; i++)
        // 10% chance to mutate, change up to 10%
        copy[i] = genes[i] + (Program.rand.Next(10) < 1 ? 
            genes[i] * 0.2 * (Program.rand.NextDouble() - 0.5) : 0.0);

    TOrganism child = new TOrganism();
    child.Genes = genes;
    return child;
}

Then you will call this method like so.

Plant myPlant = new Plant();
Plant newPlant = myPlant.Reproduce<Plant>();

I would go one step further and make this a separate class to make testing easier. Maybe even an extension method.

public static class OrganismReproducer : IOrganismReproducer
{
    public static TOrganism Reproduce<TOrganism>(this TOrganism organism)
        where TOrganism : Organism, new()
    {
        double[] copy = new double[organism.Genes.Count];

        for(int i = 0; i < copy.Length; i++)
            // 10% chance to mutate, change up to 10%
            copy[i] = genes[i] + (Program.rand.Next(10) < 1 ? 
                genes[i] * 0.2 * (Program.rand.NextDouble() - 0.5) : 0.0);

        TOrganism child = new TOrganism();
        child.Genes = genes;
        return child;
    }
}

You can then call this like so.

Plant myPlant = new Plant();
Plant newPlant = myPlant.Reproduce(); 
    // no need to specify generic type parameter
    // it is inferred based on the type of myPlant
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks I'm going with the first option. – MrFox Feb 11 '12 at 12:48

You could use reflection but having a parent class calling its child classes constructors looks fishy

public Organism Reproduce()
{
    double[] copy = new double[genes.Count];
    for(int i = 0; i < copy.Length; i++)
        // 10% chance to mutate, change up to 10%
        copy[i] = genes[i] + (Program.rand.Next(10) < 1 ? 
            genes[i] * 0.2 * (Program.rand.NextDouble() - 0.5) : 0.0);

    return Activator.CreateInstance(GetType(), copy);
}
share|improve this answer

You need to look at the OO and design here. The method could return a base class that organism or plant both inherit from while overriding Reproduce() and returning instantiations of their own types as that base type. Or plant could inherit from organism and override the method to return an instantiation of plant as an organism.

(Note: I'm not a biologist so I don't know if a plant IS an organism.)

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