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base class

class Drawer
{
    public abstract void Draw<T>(T type);    
}

derived class #1

class ADrawer : Drawer
{
    public override void Draw<T>(List<T> list)
    {
        foreach (var a in list)
        {
            DrawA(a);
        }
    }

    public void DrawA(Agent a)
    {
        //draw code here
    }
}

derived class #2

class AnotherDrawer : Drawer
{
    public override void Draw<T>(T number)
    {
        if (number == 1)
        {
            //draw code
        }
    }
}

The error is in the #1 derived class : "no suitable method found to override"

Should I be using 'virtual' in the base class as well as 'abstract' ?

How should I set the base parameter type to allow a variety of parameters in derived classes?

share|improve this question
    
Just a side note, an abstract method is implicitly a virtual method so you shouldn't ever have to define a method as both abstract AND virtual. –  docmanhattan Feb 8 '12 at 16:34
    
good to know :) –  Whiplash450 Feb 8 '12 at 16:37
2  
You have two conceptually different methods. One of your "Draw" methods draws a thing, and the other draws many things. You shouldn't be trying to make them into the same method in the first place; make two methods: Draw<T>(T item) and DrawMany<T>(IEnumerable<T> items). Same as List<T> has Add and AddRange methods; doing something to a single thing and doing something to many things are two different operations, so have two different methods. –  Eric Lippert Feb 8 '12 at 17:09

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your code has more problems than just the one you ask about. Setting aside the override question for the moment, class ADrawer needs a type constraint (where T : Agent):

class ADrawer : Drawer 
{ 
    public void Draw<T>(List<T> list) where T : Agent
    { 
        foreach (var a in list) 
        { 
            DrawA(a); 
        } 
    }
    public void DrawA(Agent a) 
    { 
        //draw code here 
    } 
} 

Without that constraint, it's not legal to pass a to DrawA, because a is a reference of type T, and without the constraint there is no implicit conversion from type T to type Agent.

The AnotherDrawer class has an illegal use of the == operator. It's not possible to apply the == operator to operands of type T and int. You could get around that by using the object.Equals override.

Finally, the base class has an error because it is a non-abstract class containing an abstract member.

In general, however, this code indicates that the class should be generic, rather than the method:

abstract class Drawer<T>
{
    public abstract void Draw(T type);
}

derived class #1

class ADrawer : Drawer<List<Agent>>
{
    public override void Draw(List<Agent> list)
    {
        foreach (var a in list)
        {
            DrawA(a);
        }
    }       

    public void DrawA(Agent a)
    {
        //draw code here
    }
}

derived class #2

class AnotherDrawer : Drawer<int>
{
    public override void Draw(int number)
    {
        if (number == 1)
        {
            //draw code
        }
    }
}

To follow up on Eric Lippert's comment, which was also my first reaction to your question, you might consider this design instead:

abstract class Drawer<T>
{
    public abstract void Draw(T type);
    public void DrawMany(IEnumerable<T> types)
    {
        foreach (var t in types)
            Draw(t);
    }
}

derived class #1

class ADrawer : Drawer<Agent>
{
    public override void DrawA(Agent a)
    {
        //draw code here
    }
}

Derived class #2 is unchanged.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for a very useful answer. I have made the base class 'Abstract' now, and everything compiles. My only problem now is that when I create a list of Drawer's I now have to specify a type (e.g List<Drawer<Type>> drawerList). What can I put that would be a generic 'type' or is there any way around this?? –  Whiplash450 Feb 9 '12 at 15:35
    
@Whiplash450 you want to have a list of drawers, where the drawers draw different types of objects? If so, look at this question and my answer to it: stackoverflow.com/q/9115593/385844. There are a few possible solutions, but none of them is as slick as you'd hope for. –  phoog Feb 9 '12 at 15:48
    
@Whiplash450 The best solution would depend a bit on the context in which you're getting the objects to be drawn. Are they also in a collection that you're iterating (in which case the reference to the objects would be of a common base type)? Or do you have a more specific static reference to an object, and you need to get the corrrect drawer for that reference? –  phoog Feb 9 '12 at 15:54
    
The point of the separate drawers is so that they each have a single responsibility for drawing one element type each (ie. agent, node etc..). These drawers take a list of objects passed at runtime. But there are other drawers that don't and just get passed an int(for example). I would like to hold all drawers in a list so that they can all be updated in one loop. –  Whiplash450 Feb 9 '12 at 16:13
    
Due to them taking different parameters in their Draw methods, the draw calls have to be made separately (which is unfortunate but unavoidable I believe). As the base Drawer class is now 'typed', does this mean the only way to store all drawers is in a custom List class? –  Whiplash450 Feb 9 '12 at 16:13

abstract method should have this signeture

  public abstract void Draw<T>(List<T> type);  
share|improve this answer
    
ah ok, but I have mutiple derived classes from the base type, that each take a different parameter type, so how to setup the base parameter 'generically'? –  Whiplash450 Feb 8 '12 at 16:35
    
I suggest making the base class have the generic parameter, then derived classes could implement Drawer<int> or Drawer<Agent> etc. –  George Duckett Feb 8 '12 at 16:59

To get it to compile change the base class to this:

class Drawer
{
    public abstract void Draw<T>(List<T> type);    
}

List<T> is not the same as T, so when you pass in a List<T> in the derived class' method you can't override the base method as that has a T parameter, not a List<T> parameter.

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