Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I want to implement a generic class AppContextItem with the generic Interface IAppcontextItem. As I want to store multiple AppContextItems inside of a List without knowing the exact type (and also I want to be able to mix multiple typed AppContextItems inside the list). I created another non-generic Interface IAppContextItem. The generic implementation of IAppContextItem should hide the non-generic fields but it somehow doesn't, because I get an compile error that tells me I need to implement Element with return type object. Is it impossible to do what I want or did I get something wrong?

IAppcontextItem.cs

public interface IAppContextItem
{

    string Key { get; set; }

    object Element { get; set; }

}

public interface IAppContextItem<T> : IAppContextItem 
    where T : class
{
    new string Key { get; set; }
    new T Element { get; set; }
}

AppContextItem.cs

public class AppContextItem<T> : IAppContextItem<T> where T : class
{

    private string key = string.Empty;
    private T element;

    public string Key
    {
        get { return key; }
        set { key = value; }
    }

    public T Element
    {
        get { return element; }
        set { element = value; }
    }
share|improve this question
1  
I can't understand why you implement the 2 interfaces, since the generic one would suffice. The only difference is the type of the Element property; you don't have any gain from the non generic interface. – jmpcm Feb 8 '12 at 16:37
    
You are right, see my comment to the answer of Wouter de Kort. – nino Feb 8 '12 at 16:52
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You have to implement both the T Element and object Element properties. The implementation for object Element will look like:

object IAppContextItem.Element
{
   get; set;
}

You can then cast it to the correct interface:

 AppContextItem<MainApp> app = new AppContextItem<MainApp>();
 IAppContextItem iapp = (IAppContextItem)app;
 object o = iapp.Element;

This is called Explicit Interface Implementation.

If you want to have a different implementation of IAppContextItem.Key and IAppContextItem<T>.Key you can use explicit interface implementation like this:

string IAppContextItem.Key
{
    get { return key + "A"; }
    set { key = value; }
}

string IAppContextItem<T>.Key
{
    get { return key + "B"; }
    set { key = value; }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This solved my problem thank you! For everyone struggling with a similar problem. I removed the generic interface as jmpcm suggested and I added object IAppContextItem.Element to the AppContextItem as Wouter de Kort suggested. Don't forget to still fil the value of getter and setter in the implementation of IAppContextItem.Element. Otherwise you will get a problem when you cast your AppContextItem to IAppcontextItem and want to access the value. – nino Feb 8 '12 at 16:49

This is the sentence that indicates your misunderstanding:

The generic implementation of IAppContextItem should hide the non-generic fields but it somehow doesn't, because I get an compile error that tells me I need to implement Element with return type object.

An interface is a contract; it says "an implementation of this interface is required to provide the following methods and properties...". Hiding a method or property via inheritance neither fulfills that part of the contract nor eliminates the requirements that the contract imposes upon the implementer.

The contract says that an implementation is required to provide four properties. That some of those properties have the same names as others does not in any way eliminate the requirement that you provide every property described by the contract. That two of those properties are "more visible" than the other two does not change the fact that the contract requires four properties. You've still got to implement all four; their visibility doesn't factor into it at all.

share|improve this answer

Wouter de Kort's answer glosses over an important point: If you want both Element properties to refer to the same object, you must not do this:

object IAppContextItem.Element
{
    get; set;
}

If you do, you'll find that you have created an auto property for the interface's Element property, whose value is independent from the T-typed Element property. Instead, you should do this:

object IAppContextItem.Element
{
    get { return this.Element; }
    set
    {
        if (!(value is T))
            throw // ... some exception
        this.Element = (T)value;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.