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Sometime during joining couples tables i seen that condition criterias placed are inside ON() clause, and sometime out of it, means after WHERE.

What approach is more optimized and faster in big amount of data ?

What will be faster 1.

SELECT a.column1, b.column2
FROM tablea a
JOIN tableb b
ON a.column3 = b.column3 
WHERE b.column2='Y' AND a.column1='N'

or this one 2.

SELECT a.column1, b.column2
FROM tablea a
JOIN tableb b
ON (a.column3 = b.column3 AND b.column2='Y')
WHERE  a.column1='N'
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up vote 6 down vote accepted

There are two ways of joining:

1/ SQL-89-style, using comma separated tables and the WHERE clause

Example:

SELECT a.column1, b.column2
FROM tablea a, tableb b
WHERE a.column3 = b.column3

2/ SQL-92-style, using the JOIN ... ON clause

Example:

SELECT a.column1, b.column2
FROM tablea a
JOIN tableb b
ON a.column3 = b.column3 

The 92 style is more modern and is preferred, because the join is actually much more visible when reading the query. You can mix both styles, and it will work, but that is a terrible idea.

About performance, I can not do better than an already existing answer on Stackoverflow. I will quote the gist of it:

According to "SQL Performance Tuning" by Peter Gulutzan and Trudy Pelzer, of the six or eight RDBMS brands they tested, there was no difference in optimization or performance of SQL-89 versus SQL-92 style joins. One can assume that most RDBMS engines transform the syntax into an internal representation before optimizing or executing the query, so the human-readable syntax makes no difference.

(emphasis mine)

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1  
The first style, using WHERE is an implied INNER JOIN. If you want to do any other kind of join you need to list it explicitly using the JOIN .. ON syntax. – Chris Feb 8 '12 at 16:46
    
@Konerak: I agree with almost all you said. But how do these answer the question about efficiency? – ypercubeᵀᴹ Feb 8 '12 at 16:48
    
btw: I think conditions after (in) ON clause should be only related to joining tables (not filtering, the "static part" of query) whenever possible and "general conditions" (anything like column = ?) and "filtering" should be in where clause, what's your opinion? – Vyktor Feb 8 '12 at 16:51
    
@ypercube: I indeed forgot to answer that second part of the question, but another answer on stackoverflow does it perfectly. I have linked to the answer and quoted the applicable paragraph. – Konerak Feb 8 '12 at 16:52
2  
@Vyktor Sometimes that won't work. Consider this: SELECT * FROM tblA LEFT JOIN tblB ON tblA.id = tblB.id WHERE tblB.active = 'Y' If there's no matching record in tblB, its fields will be null (duh, because it's a left join). But then if tblB.active is null, the WHERE will filter that one out. In this case, tblB.active = 'Y' needs to be in the join condition. – Wiseguy Feb 8 '12 at 16:57

ON is a part of ternary table operation <table1> JOIN <table2> ON <condition>. The result of this operation is a imaginary table with which statement works.

WHERE is a clause which filters records.

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