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The following code gives you a compiler error, as you'd expect:

List<Banana> aBunchOfBananas = new List<Banana>();

Banana justOneBanana = (Banana)aBunchOfBananas;

However, when using IEnumerable<Banana>, you merely get a runtime error.

IEnumerable<Banana> aBunchOfBananas = new List<Banana>();

Banana justOneBanana = (Banana)aBunchOfBananas;

Why does the C# compiler allow this?

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A list of things is not a single thing. –  David Lively Feb 8 '12 at 17:07
2  
Not allowed with value types, though. –  ken2k Feb 8 '12 at 17:08
1  
This also apples(ok applies) to IList<Banana>. That's what made the whole interface vs concrete class click for me in the answers below. –  deepee1 Feb 8 '12 at 22:34
    
very very bad design from MS. The answers are not convincing to have this feature.. –  nawfal Mar 2 '13 at 20:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 47 down vote accepted

I would suppose it's because IEnumerable<T> is an interface where some implementation could have an explicit cast to Banana - no matter how silly that would be.

On the other hand, the compiler knows that List<T> can't be explicitly cast to a Banana.

Nice choice of examples, by the way!

Adding an example to clarify. Maybe we'd have some "enumerable" that should always contain at most a single Banana:

public class SingleItemList<T>:Banana, IEnumerable<T> where T:Banana {
    public static explicit operator T(SingleItemList<T> enumerable) {
        return enumerable.SingleOrDefault();
    }

    // Others omitted...
}

Then you could actually do this:

IEnumerable<Banana> aBunchOfBananas = new SingleItemList<Banana>();
Banana justOneBanana = (Banana)aBunchOfBananas;

As it's the same as writing the following, which the compiler is perfectly happy with:

Banana justOneBanana = aBunchOfBananas.SingleOrDefault();
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4  
You can't do this - it won't find the operator. An example would be class SingleBanana : Banana, IEnumerable<Banana>. This is why this only works for interfaces - because if both types are classes, this can be determined to be impossible at compile time. –  Random832 Feb 8 '12 at 20:04
    
@Random832 Good catch, but in fact your class signature won't work either (you can't have an explicit conversion to a base class). I've updated my answer with a version that does as intended. –  Yuck Feb 8 '12 at 20:17
    
Er, my point was you can't use operator overloading at all for this. The reason it works is because a derived class object is inherently convertible to the base class. –  Random832 Feb 9 '12 at 0:45
1  
But my point was you don't need the operator at all - an empty class [other than the interface implementation] with the signature I gave in my first comment is sufficient. –  Random832 Feb 9 '12 at 1:48
1  
@Random832 I understand, but the explicit conversion operator is there to illustrate the point. I could have written the example with an empty class inheriting from Banana and implementing IEnumerable<T>, but I felt this was more clear. –  Yuck Feb 9 '12 at 1:56

When you say Y y = (Y)x; this cast says to the compiler "trust me, whatever x is, at runtime it can be casted to a Y, so, just do it, okay?"

But when you say

List<Banana> aBunchOfBananas = new List<Banana>();
Banana justOneBanana = (Banana)aBunchOfBananas;

the compiler can look at the definitions for each of these concrete classes (Banana and List<Banana>) and see that there is no static explicit operator Banana(List<Banana> bananas) defined (remember, an explicit cast must be defined in either the type being casted or the type being casted to, this is from the spec, section 17.9.4). It knows at compile time that what you're saying can not ever be true. So it yells at you to stop lying.

But when you say

IEnumerable<Banana> aBunchOfBananas = new List<Banana>();
Banana justOneBanana = (Banana)aBunchOfBananas;

well, now the compiler doesn't know. It very well could the case that whatever aBunchOfBananas happens to be at run time, its concrete type X could have defined static explicit operator Banana(X bananas). So the compiler trusts you, like you asked it to.

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This was downvoted? –  Jason Feb 8 '12 at 21:12
    
Maybe because you didn't mention you make a distinction between classes and integers? Not knowing that, your first (X and Y) and second example are exactly the same. –  Jouke van der Maas Feb 14 '12 at 19:24
1  
Yes this is downvoted... it's wrong. Conversion operators can't be found at runtime (unless the dynamic keyword gets involved). Have another downvote. –  Ben Voigt Aug 21 '13 at 0:40
    
I'm sorry, but what part of it is wrong? –  Jason Aug 21 '13 at 2:14
    
This part is wrong: It very well could [be] the case that whatever aBunchOfBananas happens to be at run time, its concrete type X could have defined static explicit operator Banana(X bananas). –  Michael Liu Jan 13 at 20:26

It may be because the compiler knows that Banana does not extend List<T>, but that there's a possibility that some object which implements IEnumerable<T> may also extend Banana and make that a valid cast.

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1  
Sad to see the only correct answer, posted among the first, not get as many upvotes. Perhaps a short code snippet would help. –  Ben Voigt Aug 21 '13 at 0:43

According to language spec (6.2.4) "The explicit reference conversions are: From any class-type S to any interface-type T, provided S is not sealed and provided S does not implement T ... The explicit reference conversions are those conversions between reference-types that require run-time checks to ensure they are correct..."

So compiler doesn't check interface realization during compilation. It does CLR in runtime. It checks metadata trying to find realization in class or among its parents. I dunno why it behaves like this. Probably it takes a lot of time. So this code compiles correctly:

public interface IInterface
{}

public class Banana
{
}

class Program
{
    static void Main( string[] args )
    {
        Banana banana = new Banana();

        IInterface b = (IInterface)banana;
    }
}

In other hand if we try to cast banana to class, compiler checks its metadata and throw an error:

 FileStream fs = (FileStream)banana;
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