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I want to work out a bit of code that generates the oscillator wave-type in my tone generator app. The one in this example is a sine-wave, can someone tell me how the code works, as i want to in the future make custom wave-types and square, sawtooth and triangle types.

OSStatus RenderTone(
    void *inRefCon, 
    AudioUnitRenderActionFlags  *ioActionFlags, 
    const AudioTimeStamp        *inTimeStamp, 
    UInt32                      inBusNumber, 
    UInt32                      inNumberFrames, 
    AudioBufferList             *ioData)

{
    // Fixed amplitude is good enough for our purposes
    const double amplitude = 0.25;

    // Get the tone parameters out of the view controller
    ToneGeneratorViewController *viewController =
        (ToneGeneratorViewController *)inRefCon;
    double theta = viewController->theta;
    double theta_increment = 2.0 * M_PI * viewController->frequency / viewController->sampleRate;

    // This is a mono tone generator so we only need the first buffer
    const int channel = 0;
    Float32 *buffer = (Float32 *)ioData->mBuffers[channel].mData;

     // Generate the samples
     for (UInt32 frame = 0; frame < inNumberFrames; frame++) 
    {
        buffer[frame] = sin(theta) * amplitude;

        theta += theta_increment;
        if (theta > 2.0 * M_PI)
        {
             theta -= 2.0 * M_PI;
        } 
    }

    // Store the theta back in the view controller
    viewController->theta = theta;

    return noErr;

}
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1  
What is your question, specifically? –  Brad Feb 8 '12 at 17:32
1  
i want to know how the "generate the samples" work. and how to modify it to make different waves, like sawtooth, triangle and square. –  user1197773 Feb 8 '12 at 17:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The actual sine wave samples are being generated and are populating the buffer in the snippet below

for (UInt32 frame = 0; frame < inNumberFrames; frame++) 
{
    buffer[frame] = sin(theta) * amplitude;

    theta += theta_increment;
    if (theta > 2.0 * M_PI)
    {
         theta -= 2.0 * M_PI;
    } 
}

In the line where buffer[frame] is being assigned, you are calling sin(theta) * amplitude, and for each iteration of the for loop, you are incrementing theta by some finite step size based on your frequency and sample rate, via

double theta_increment = 2.0 * M_PI * viewController->frequency / viewController->sampleRate;

Which is essentially dividing 2.0 * PI * frequency by your sample rate.

Incrementing the theta variable while looping through the for loop is basically advancing the time step one sample at a time until your buffer is full (i.e. frame == iNumberFrames).

If you wanted to generate something other than a sine wave, you would simply replace the following line with some other function:

buffer[frame] = sin(theta) * amplitude;

I.e. let's say, for example, you wanted the first three terms in the infinite Fourier series that converges to a triangle wave; you might then have the following instead...

buffer[frame] = (8 / pow(M_PI,2)) * (sin(theta) - sin(3*theta)/9 + sin(5*theta)/25);
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Is there a method to create new frequencies based on knowledge of what the wave type looks like. –  user1197773 Feb 8 '12 at 17:56
    
I'm not quite sure what you're asking here -- do you mean feedback control of the sinusoidal frequency? If so, that would largely depend on the rest of your software (and hardware) implementation... Otherwise, it looks like the frequency of the signal is dictated by the frequency member variable of your ToneGeneratorViewController. I'd start looking there and see if there is a setter you can use to manipulate that value during runtime. –  hatboyzero Feb 8 '12 at 17:59
1  
sorry i meant: Is there a method for creating a new wave-types, from knowledge of what the wave type looks like. so i can see a triangle wave then understand how to create one. –  user1197773 Feb 8 '12 at 18:00
    
Yeah, you could define a WaveformStrategy, which is essentially a strategy design pattern. Then, you could just pass the ToneGeneratorViewController (or whatever structure you are using to maintain the sampler state) to the particular concrete WaveformStrategy instance (i.e. a SinusoidalWaveformStrategy or a SawtoothWaveformStrategy and pass it the appropriate timestep or omega into a computeSample() method and populate buffer[frame] with the resulting value). –  hatboyzero Feb 8 '12 at 18:04
1  
Ok, i don't know if i quite understand all this but i'll work on it, because the knowledge is now there, thanks. also i'll thumbs up your question when i get enough Rep. –  user1197773 Feb 8 '12 at 18:06

To produce your desired waveform, you need to replace the sin() function with a function that produces your desired wave shape.

You might be able to find this function in a table of functions with graphical examples, or you might have to create your function. The are lots of ways to create a functional approximation, including polynomial, Fourier series, table lookup with or without interpolation, recursions, and etc. But that is a big subject on its own (many textbooks, etc.)

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it does not work on creating the series of impulses , dude –  Raju Gujarati May 13 at 2:18

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